Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Dorothy Miller Richardson

Dorothy Miller Richardson

(17 May 1873 – 17 June 1957) was a British author and journalist. Author of Pilgrimage, a sequence of 13 novels, she was one of the earliest modernist novelists to use stream of consciousness as a narrative technique. Richardson also emphasizes in Pilgrimage the importance and distinct nature of female experiences.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(17 May 1873 – 17 June 1957) was a British author and journalist. Author of Pilgrimage, a sequence of 13 novels, she was one of the earliest modernist novelists to use stream of consciousness as a narrative technique. Richardson also emphasizes in Pilgrimage the importance and distinct nature of female experiences.

Photo of Maria Mitchell

Maria Mitchell

(1818 Aug 1 – 1889 Jun 28; born in Nantucket, Maria studied astronomy as a girl. She was best known as the first female astronomer in the US and for her comet discovered in 1847, Miss Mitchell’s Comet. A professor of astronomy at Vassar, Maria co-founded the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1873.Read More
Website: Biography.com – Maria Mitchell

(1818 Aug 1 – 1889 Jun 28; born in Nantucket, Maria studied astronomy as a girl. She was best known as the first female astronomer in the US and for her comet discovered in 1847, Miss Mitchell’s Comet. A professor of astronomy at Vassar, Maria co-founded the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1873.

Photo of Lillian Moller Gilbreth

Lillian Moller Gilbreth

(May 24, 1878 – January 2, 1972) was an American psychologist, industrial engineer, consultant, and educator who was an early pioneer in applying psychology to time-and-motion studies. She was described in the 1940s as "a genius in the art of living." Gilbreth, one of the first female engineers to earn a Ph.D., is considered to be the first industrial/organizational psychologist.…Read More

(May 24, 1878 – January 2, 1972) was an American psychologist, industrial engineer, consultant, and educator who was an early pioneer in applying psychology to time-and-motion studies. She was described in the 1940s as “a genius in the art of living.” Gilbreth, one of the first female engineers to earn a Ph.D., is considered to be the first industrial/organizational psychologist. She and her husband, Frank Bunker Gilbreth, were efficiency experts who contributed to the study of industrial engineering, especially in the areas of motion study and human factors. Cheaper by the Dozen (1948) and Belles on Their Toes (1950), written by two of their children (Ernestine and Frank Jr.) tell the story of their family life and describe how time-and-motion studies were applied to the organization and daily activities of their large family. Both books were later made into feature films. Until 2005, Lillian was the only woman awarded the prestigious Hoover Award, jointly bestowed by five leading engineering organizations recognizing “great, unselfish, non-technical services by engineers to humanity.”

Photo of Diti Mookherjee

Diti Mookherjee

is a Fulbright-Nehru Fellow for Environmental Leadership 2011-12. She is a founding member of Association for Social and Environmental Development. She worked for eight years in SAHAY, a non-profit organization, affiliated to Children International, USA, conducting a child sponsorship in 10 districts of West Bengal with 28 partners. She was a consultant to the DFID supported West Bengal Civil Society Support Program (WBCSSP) in operation from 2006 till October 2009.…Read More
Website: Association for Social and Environmental Development

is a Fulbright-Nehru Fellow for Environmental Leadership 2011-12. She is a founding member of Association for Social and Environmental Development. She worked for eight years in SAHAY, a non-profit organization, affiliated to Children International, USA, conducting a child sponsorship in 10 districts of West Bengal with 28 partners. She was a consultant to the DFID supported West Bengal Civil Society Support Program (WBCSSP) in operation from 2006 till October 2009. She has been a consultant to the various health sector organizations including Technical Assistant Support, and has served as the President of the Development Research Communications and Services Centre (DRCSC), a renowned organization working on natural resource management.

Photo of Cathleen Morawetz

Cathleen Morawetz

(5 May  1923 – 8 August 2017)) was a mathematician whose theorems often found use in solving real-world engineering problems, and the first woman to belong to the Applied Mathematics Section of the National Academy of Sciences.Read More
Website: New York Times

(5 May  1923 – 8 August 2017)) was a mathematician whose theorems often found use in solving real-world engineering problems, and the first woman to belong to the Applied Mathematics Section of the National Academy of Sciences.

Photo of Agnes Fay Morgan

Agnes Fay Morgan

(May 4, 1884– July 20, 1968) American biochemist who pioneered the development of home economics as a scientific discipline and spearheaded research in nutrition.  She played a major role in transforming the field of home economics by making chemistry an integral part of the curriculum. She also did pioneering research on the bio-chemistry of vitamins, although she was proudest of her administrative accomplishments, which included building up one of the best home economics departments in the country during that era and organizing and chairing numerous meetings on nutrition.Read More
Website: Encyclopedia.com

(May 4, 1884– July 20, 1968) American biochemist who pioneered the development of home economics as a scientific discipline and spearheaded research in nutrition.  She played a major role in transforming the field of home economics by making chemistry an integral part of the curriculum. She also did pioneering research on the bio-chemistry of vitamins, although she was proudest of her administrative accomplishments, which included building up one of the best home economics departments in the country during that era and organizing and chairing numerous meetings on nutrition.

Photo of Erica Morini

Erica Morini

(1904 Jan 5 - 1995 Oct 31) played the violin, at five, for Emperor Franz Joseph. Thunderstruck by her talent, he asked what he could give the child. She asked for a doll whose eyes opened and shut. Erica studied first with her father, then at eight, with renowned teachers at the Vienna Conservatory. By 11, she gave her first concert.…Read More

(1904 Jan 5 – 1995 Oct 31) played the violin, at five, for Emperor Franz Joseph. Thunderstruck by her talent, he asked what he could give the child. She asked for a doll whose eyes opened and shut. Erica studied first with her father, then at eight, with renowned teachers at the Vienna Conservatory. By 11, she gave her first concert. At 16, she began her first tour and trip to America (where she ultimately settled). Throughout her career, she complained of managerial narrow-mindedness and prejudice regarding women musicians. Erica retired in 1976, considered “the most bewitching violinist of the century.”

Photo of Belle Moskowitz

Belle Moskowitz

(October 5, 1877 – January 2, 1933) Belle was the political advisor to New York Governor and 1928 presidential candidate Al Smith. She met her second husband, Henry Moskowitz while working with him on the investigations that followed the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire and her growing reputation led disputatious Garment District unions and employers to agree to her serving as arbitrator to hear workers' grievances.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 5, 1877 – January 2, 1933) Belle was the political advisor to New York Governor and 1928 presidential candidate Al Smith. She met her second husband, Henry Moskowitz while working with him on the investigations that followed the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire and her growing reputation led disputatious Garment District unions and employers to agree to her serving as arbitrator to hear workers’ grievances.

Photo of Nana Mouskouri

Nana Mouskouri

(born 1934 Oct 13) was one of the best-selling singers in the world. She watched movies with her father while he was a projectionist at the local cinema. She studied to be an opera singer but was barred from her Conservatoire end-of-year exams because she’d been seen singing jazz. She started singing at the Zaki club in Athens.…Read More
Website: Nana Mouskouri – Wikipedia

(born 1934 Oct 13) was one of the best-selling singers in the world. She watched movies with her father while he was a projectionist at the local cinema. She studied to be an opera singer but was barred from her Conservatoire end-of-year exams because she’d been seen singing jazz. She started singing at the Zaki club in Athens. She began recording in 1957 and by 1961 Nana was on her way. She worked with Manos Hadjidakis, Michel LeGrande, Quincy Jones, and many more. Nana speaks 7 languages and sings, predominantly, in Greek, French, German and English. She is a UNICEF ambassador and Member of the European Parliament.

Photo of Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE

Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE

(/ˈmɜːrdɒk/; 15 July 1919 – 8 February 1999) was an Irish novelist and philosopher, best known for her novels about good and evil, sexual relationships, morality, and the power of the unconscious. Her first published novel, Under the Net, was selected in 1998 as one of Modern Library's 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(/ˈmɜːrdɒk/; 15 July 1919 – 8 February 1999) was an Irish novelist and philosopher, best known for her novels about good and evil, sexual relationships, morality, and the power of the unconscious. Her first published novel, Under the Net, was selected in 1998 as one of Modern Library’s 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. In 1987, she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In 2008, The Times ranked Murdoch twelfth on a list of The 50 greatest British writers since 1945″.”

Photo of Emily Murphy

Emily Murphy

(1868 Mar 14 - 1933 Oct 27) was the first female magistrate in Canada and the British Empire. In 1916, Emily persuaded the Alberta legislature to pass the Dower Act that would allow a woman legal rights to one third of her husband’s property.Read More

(1868 Mar 14 – 1933 Oct 27) was the first female magistrate in Canada and the British Empire. In 1916, Emily persuaded the Alberta legislature to pass the Dower Act that would allow a woman legal rights to one third of her husband’s property.

Photo of Grace Brewster Murray Hopper

Grace Brewster Murray Hopper

(December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992), née Grace Brewster Murray, was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1944, invented the first compiler for a computer programming language, and was one of those who popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992), née Grace Brewster Murray, was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1944, invented the first compiler for a computer programming language, and was one of those who popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages.

Owing to her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace“. The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as is the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC.

Photo of Empress Myeongseong

Empress Myeongseong

(1851 Oct 19 - 1895 Oct 8) sided with the Progressive movement in Korea, promoted radical reforms (making ammunition, schools, newspapers, hospitals) and was assassinated by samurai as a result.Read More
Website: New World Encyclopedia

(1851 Oct 19 – 1895 Oct 8) sided with the Progressive movement in Korea, promoted radical reforms (making ammunition, schools, newspapers, hospitals) and was assassinated by samurai as a result.

Photo of Bette Nesmith Graham

Bette Nesmith Graham

(March 23, 1924 – May 12, 1980) was an American typist, commercial artist, and the inventor of the correction fluid Liquid Paper (not to be confused with competitor White-Out). From the start, Graham ran her company with a unique combination of spirituality, egalitarianism, and pragmatism. She believed that women could bring a more nurturing and humanistic quality to the male world of business, and provided a greenbelt with a fish pond, an employee library, and a childcare center in her new company headquarters in 1975.…Read More

(March 23, 1924 – May 12, 1980) was an American typist, commercial artist, and the inventor of the correction fluid Liquid Paper (not to be confused with competitor White-Out). From the start, Graham ran her company with a unique combination of spirituality, egalitarianism, and pragmatism. She believed that women could bring a more nurturing and humanistic quality to the male world of business, and provided a greenbelt with a fish pond, an employee library, and a childcare center in her new company headquarters in 1975.

 

She sold Liquid Paper to the Gillette Corporation for $47.5 million in 1979. At the time, her company employed 200 people and made 25 million bottles of Liquid Paper per year.

Photo of New England Female Medical College

New England Female Medical College

First female medical college. It named among its graduates Rebecca Lee Crumper, the first African-American to earn a medical degree, which she did in 1864.  Women such as Harriot Kezia Hunt had served as family physicians, but women were denied attendance at medical lectures and examinations. In 1847, Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to enroll in a United States medical school when she entered the Geneva Medical College.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

First female medical college. It named among its graduates Rebecca Lee Crumper, the first African-American to earn a medical degree, which she did in 1864.  Women such as Harriot Kezia Hunt had served as family physicians, but women were denied attendance at medical lectures and examinations. In 1847, Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to enroll in a United States medical school when she entered the Geneva Medical College.

Photo of Queen Anna Nzinga

Queen Anna Nzinga

(c. 1583 – December 17, 1663), also known as Njinga Mbande or Ana de Sousa Nzinga Mbande, was a 17th-century queen (muchino a muhatu) of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in Angola. She came to power as an ambassador after demonstrating a proclivity to tactfully diffuse foreign crisis, as she regained control of the Portuguese fortress of Ambaca.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(c. 1583 – December 17, 1663), also known as Njinga Mbande or Ana de Sousa Nzinga Mbande, was a 17th-century queen (muchino a muhatu) of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms of the Mbundu people in Angola. She came to power as an ambassador after demonstrating a proclivity to tactfully diffuse foreign crisis, as she regained control of the Portuguese fortress of Ambaca. She assumed the powers of ruling in Ndongo after the suicide of her brother. Nzinga assumed control as regent of his young son, Kaza. Today, she is remembered in Angola for her political and diplomatic acumen, as well as her brilliant military tactics. A major street in Luanda is named after her, and a statue of her was placed in Kinaxixi on a square in 2002, dedicated by President Santos to celebrate the 27th anniversary of independence.

Photo of Edna O’Brien

Edna O’Brien

(born 15 December 1930) is an Irish novelist, memoirist, playwright, poet and short story writer. Philip Roth has described her "the most gifted woman now writing in English", while former President of Ireland Mary Robinson has cited her as "one of the great creative writers of her generation."Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born 15 December 1930) is an Irish novelist, memoirist, playwright, poet and short story writer. Philip Roth has described her “the most gifted woman now writing in English”, while former President of Ireland Mary Robinson has cited her as “one of the great creative writers of her generation.”

Photo of Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley

(1860–1926) She was an American sharpshooter and exhibition shooter. Her amazing talent" first came to light when the then 15-year-old won a shooting match with traveling show marksman Frank E. Butler (whom she married). The couple joined Buffalo Bill's Wild West show a few years later. Oakley became a renowned international starRead More
Website: Wikipedia

(1860–1926) She was an American sharpshooter and exhibition shooter. Her amazing talent” first came to light when the then 15-year-old won a shooting match with traveling show marksman Frank E. Butler (whom she married). The couple joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show a few years later. Oakley became a renowned international star

Photo of Yolande of Aragon

Yolande of Aragon

(11 August 1384 – 14 November 1442) - Yolande played a crucial role in the struggles between France and England, influencing events such as the financing of Joan of Arc's army in 1429 and tipping the balance in favour of the French. She was also known as Jolantha de Aragon and Violant d'Aragó.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(11 August 1384 – 14 November 1442) – Yolande played a crucial role in the struggles between France and England, influencing events such as the financing of Joan of Arc‘s army in 1429 and tipping the balance in favour of the French. She was also known as Jolantha de Aragon and Violant d’Aragó. Tradition holds that she commissioned the famous Rohan Hours.  Helped fund her war and had a lot of connections and spies throughout the land. “There is no more effective camouflage in history than to have been born a woman,”  she said.

Photo of Saint Clair of Asisi

Saint Clair of Asisi

(July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253) - born Chiara Offreduccio, is an Italian saint and one of the first followers of Saint Francis of Assisi. She founded the Order of Poor Ladies, a monastic religious order for women in the Franciscan tradition, and wrote their Rule of Life—the first monastic rule known to have been written by a woman.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253) – born Chiara Offreduccio, is an Italian saint and one of the first followers of Saint Francis of Assisi. She founded the Order of Poor Ladies, a monastic religious order for women in the Franciscan tradition, and wrote their Rule of Life—the first monastic rule known to have been written by a woman.