Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Henrietta Locke

Henrietta Locke

(August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951) (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson). Her immortal DNA is helping to cure ovarian cancer. She was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951) (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson). Her immortal DNA is helping to cure ovarian cancer. She was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research.

Photo of Belva Lockwood

Belva Lockwood

(October 24, 1830 – May 19, 1917). Tried to run for U.S. President, 1884.  She was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women's rights. The press of her day referred to her as a "suffragist.” Lockwood overcame many social and personal obstacles related to gender restrictions.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 24, 1830 – May 19, 1917). Tried to run for U.S. President, 1884.  She was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women’s rights. The press of her day referred to her as a “suffragist.” Lockwood overcame many social and personal obstacles related to gender restrictions. After college, she worked to equalize pay for women in education.

Photo of Louise Mack

Louise Mack

(1870 Oct 10 - 1935 Nov 23) was born in Tasmania, Miss Louise Mack was the first woman war correspondent (WWI) for London’s the Daily Mail and Evening News. She wrote poems as a girl, published young adult books as a teen and adult novels as a young woman. Louise moved to Florence and took on the editorship of the Italian Gazette.…Read More
Website: Poem Hunter – Biography

(1870 Oct 10 – 1935 Nov 23) was born in Tasmania, Miss Louise Mack was the first woman war correspondent (WWI) for London’s the Daily Mail and Evening News. She wrote poems as a girl, published young adult books as a teen and adult novels as a young woman. Louise moved to Florence and took on the editorship of the Italian Gazette. Lord Northcliffe hired her for his London papers. Disguised as a housemaid and stationed in Antwerp, Louise sent on-the-spot accounts of the advancing German occupation. Imminent danger forced her to escape to Holland and her book, A Woman’s Experiences in the Great War. Back in Australia, she raised money for the Red Cross, and met and married Allen Leyland. Following his early death, Louise resumed traveling and writing for newspapers and magazines and published two more books. She died in 1935.

Photo of Anna Magnani

Anna Magnani

(1908 Mar 7 - 1973 Sept 26) was an Italian actress of “volcanic” abilities. To support her study at the Academy of Dramatic Art, she played piano and sang in nightclubs. In 1933 Magnani began acting in films. At 34, she had an affair with actor Massimo Seratoa and they had a son, Luca. In 1945, she began an affair with Roberto Rossellini and they made their neo-realistic masterpiece, “Open City.” Her first English-speaking film, “The Rose Tattoo,” won her the Best Actress award in 1955.…Read More

(1908 Mar 7 – 1973 Sept 26) was an Italian actress of “volcanic” abilities. To support her study at the Academy of Dramatic Art, she played piano and sang in nightclubs. In 1933 Magnani began acting in films. At 34, she had an affair with actor Massimo Seratoa and they had a son, Luca. In 1945, she began an affair with Roberto Rossellini and they made their neo-realistic masterpiece, “Open City.” Her first English-speaking film, “The Rose Tattoo,” won her the Best Actress award in 1955. Written specifically for her by Tennessee Williams, he believed that Anna was “the most explosive emotional actress of her generation,” “…I never heard a false word from her mouth.”

Photo of Asmaa Mahfouz

Asmaa Mahfouz

(1 February 1985 - ) is an Egyptian activist and one of the founders of the April 6 Movement. She helped to spark a mass uprising through her video blog posted one week before the start of the 2011 Egyptian revolution. She is a prominent member of Egypt's Coalition of the Youth of Revolution and was one of five recipients of the "Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought", awarded for contributions to "historic changes in the Arab world".Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(1 February 1985 – ) is an Egyptian activist and one of the founders of the April 6 Movement. She helped to spark a mass uprising through her video blog posted one week before the start of the 2011 Egyptian revolution. She is a prominent member of Egypt’s Coalition of the Youth of Revolution and was one of five recipients of the “Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought”, awarded for contributions to “historic changes in the Arab world”.

Photo of Victoria Maier

Victoria Maier

later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman's suffrage movement. In 1872, Woodhull was the first female to run for President of the United States. An activist for women's rights and labor reforms, Woodhull was also an advocate of free love, by which she meant the freedom to marry, divorce, and bear children without government interference.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

later Victoria Woodhull Martin (September 23, 1838 – June 9, 1927) was an American leader of the woman’s suffrage movement. In 1872, Woodhull was the first female to run for President of the United States. An activist for women’s rights and labor reforms, Woodhull was also an advocate of free love, by which she meant the freedom to marry, divorce, and bear children without government interference.

Photo of Vivian Maier

Vivian Maier

(February 1, 1926 – April 21, 2009) - was an American street photographer. Maier worked for about forty years as a nanny, mostly in Chicago's North Shore, pursuing photography during her spare time. She took more than 150,000 photographs during her career, primarily of the people and architecture of New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles, although she also traveled and photographed worldwide.…Read More
Website: Website Website: Wikipedia

(February 1, 1926 – April 21, 2009) – was an American street photographer. Maier worked for about forty years as a nanny, mostly in Chicago’s North Shore, pursuing photography during her spare time. She took more than 150,000 photographs during her career, primarily of the people and architecture of New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles, although she also traveled and photographed worldwide.  

Photo of Katherine Mansfield Beauchamp

Katherine Mansfield Beauchamp

(1888 Oct 14 - 1923 Jan 9) was born in New Zealand and started writing and publishing at age 10. At 17, she left New Zealand and her family for London. Friends with Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, that crowd, she wrote short stories (Prelude, The Aloe), loved and married 2 men and loved 2 women, developed tuberculosis and died at age 34.…Read More
Website: Poetry Foundation – Katherine Mansfield

(1888 Oct 14 – 1923 Jan 9) was born in New Zealand and started writing and publishing at age 10. At 17, she left New Zealand and her family for London. Friends with Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, that crowd, she wrote short stories (Prelude, The Aloe), loved and married 2 men and loved 2 women, developed tuberculosis and died at age 34. Prolific and bohemian, her legacy is profound and brilliant.

Photo of Kathleen Mansfield Murry

Kathleen Mansfield Murry

(14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) was a prominent New Zealand modernist short story writer who was born and brought up in colonial New Zealand and wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield. At 19, Mansfield left New Zealand and settled in the United Kingdom, where she became a friend of modernist writers such as D.H.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) was a prominent New Zealand modernist short story writer who was born and brought up in colonial New Zealand and wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield. At 19, Mansfield left New Zealand and settled in the United Kingdom, where she became a friend of modernist writers such as D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf. In 1917 she was diagnosed with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, which led to her death at the age of 34.

Photo of Becky Margiotta

Becky Margiotta

(DOB unknown) A social entrepreneur who vacillates between wanting to savor and save the world. Co-founded The Billions Institute to create new institutions that are capable of solving the world's biggest problems. Co-founded Big Mountain Play to help people experience personal transformation in the wilderness.Read More
Website: LinkedIn

(DOB unknown) A social entrepreneur who vacillates between wanting to savor and save the world. Co-founded The Billions Institute to create new institutions that are capable of solving the world’s biggest problems. Co-founded Big Mountain Play to help people experience personal transformation in the wilderness.

Photo of Lynn Margulis

Lynn Margulis

(March 5, 1938 – November 22, 2011) was an American evolutionary theorist, taxonomist, bacteriologist, protistologist, and botanist, with advanced degrees in zoology and genetics. She was known to the public as a science author, educator, and popularizer, and above all recognized as the primary modern proponent for the significance of symbiosis in biological evolution. She developed a theory of the origin of eukaryotic organelles, and contributed to the endosymbiotic theory, which is now generally accepted for how certain organelles were formed.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(March 5, 1938 – November 22, 2011) was an American evolutionary theorist, taxonomist, bacteriologist, protistologist, and botanist, with advanced degrees in zoology and genetics. She was known to the public as a science author, educator, and popularizer, and above all recognized as the primary modern proponent for the significance of symbiosis in biological evolution. She developed a theory of the origin of eukaryotic organelles, and contributed to the endosymbiotic theory, which is now generally accepted for how certain organelles were formed. Led to the development of the Gaia Theory.

Photo of Constance Markievicz

Constance Markievicz

(4 February 1868 - 15 July 1927) was a suffragette and revolutionary Irish nationalist who tirelessly fought for the cause and ended up being the first woman ever elected to the British House of Commons. Read More
Website: Claddagh Design

(4 February 1868 – 15 July 1927) was a suffragette and revolutionary Irish nationalist who tirelessly fought for the cause and ended up being the first woman ever elected to the British House of Commons.

Photo of Mary Margaret McBride

Mary Margaret McBride

(November 16, 1899 - April 7, 1976) was an American radio interview host and writer. Her popular radio shows spanned more than 40 years; she is also remembered for her few months of pioneering television, as an early sign of radio success not guaranteeing a transition to the new medium. She was sometimes known as The First Lady of Radio." First radio interviewer to bring in techniques for journalism.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(November 16, 1899 – April 7, 1976) was an American radio interview host and writer. Her popular radio shows spanned more than 40 years; she is also remembered for her few months of pioneering television, as an early sign of radio success not guaranteeing a transition to the new medium. She was sometimes known as The First Lady of Radio.” First radio interviewer to bring in techniques for journalism.

Photo of Geraldine McCullough

Geraldine McCullough

(1917 - 2008) was considered one of the best metal sculptors in America. She trained in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and taught art for 14 years. By the late 50s, she was showing her paintings around the country. Her husband taught her to weld and helped her lug heavy metal art around.…Read More
Website: Encylopedia.com – Geraldine McCullough

(1917 – 2008) was considered one of the best metal sculptors in America. She trained in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and taught art for 14 years. By the late 50s, she was showing her paintings around the country. Her husband taught her to weld and helped her lug heavy metal art around. She went from obscurity into national and international prominence with her monumental piece, The Phoenix. Another famous piece, Our King, has become a landmark in Chicago’s West Side.

Photo of Winsome McIntosh

Winsome McIntosh

She went to college in 1966 for Business Administration. Back then if a woman went to college, graduated, and was on the Dean's List for consecutive years she was still unable to find a job in the business world. McIntosh created her own business with her husband which was eventually sold. She is now a philanthropist and focuses on helping women break barriers.Read More
Website: Website Website: Article

She went to college in 1966 for Business Administration. Back then if a woman went to college, graduated, and was on the Dean’s List for consecutive years she was still unable to find a job in the business world. McIntosh created her own business with her husband which was eventually sold. She is now a philanthropist and focuses on helping women break barriers.

Photo of Freda Meissner-Blau

Freda Meissner-Blau

(1927 Mar 11 - 2015 Dec 22) was an Austrian activist and figurehead in the Austrian Green Party. At 11, she watched the bombing of Dresden. She studied communication, journalism, completed nursing school and moved to Frankfurt. Later, in Belgian Congo, Freda witnessed the struggle of the Congo Crisis. By 1970, with her living partner, Paul Blau, Freda attached herself to the anti-nuclear movement.…Read More
Website: The Nuclear-Free Future Award

(1927 Mar 11 – 2015 Dec 22) was an Austrian activist and figurehead in the Austrian Green Party. At 11, she watched the bombing of Dresden. She studied communication, journalism, completed nursing school and moved to Frankfurt. Later, in Belgian Congo, Freda witnessed the struggle of the Congo Crisis. By 1970, with her living partner, Paul Blau, Freda attached herself to the anti-nuclear movement. Becoming the spokesperson and leader she helped establish the Austrian Green Party. She received a Lifetime Achievement Nuclear-Free Future Award in 2007 and a Save the World Award in 2009. “Governments, bureaucrats and national economists still chase after the chimera of an infinitely expanding economy in this, a finite world. Their logic is the logic of money… But money is not the currency of nature. Money can never measure the worth of a life…”

Photo of Lise Meitner

Lise Meitner

(1878 Nov 7 - 1968 Oct 27) was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics was born. She and Otto Hahn led a group of scientists who first discovered nuclear fission of uranium, and its potential. Lise was the first woman to become a full professor of physics in Germany. She lost that position in ’38: she was Jewish.…Read More
Website: Lise Meitner – Wikipedia

(1878 Nov 7 – 1968 Oct 27) was an Austrian-Swedish physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics was born. She and Otto Hahn led a group of scientists who first discovered nuclear fission of uranium, and its potential. Lise was the first woman to become a full professor of physics in Germany. She lost that position in ’38: she was Jewish. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for that nuclear fission discovery went to Otto Hahn in 1944. Lise wasn’t even mentioned. Jew, woman, she’d fled to Sweden and became a Swedish citizen. Her exclusion from the Nobel has given rise to posthumous honors, including naming a chemical element, meitnerium (element 109) in 1997.

Photo of Lee Miller

Lee Miller

(1907 Apr 23 - 1977 Jul 21) was best known as a fashion model and photographer. She was muse/model/lover to Edward Steichen and Man Ray, pals with Picasso and Jean Cocteau and provided her art studio oasis to Dubuffet, Moore and Ernst. Lee was also a brave photojournalist during WWII. A wife twice, a mother of one.…Read More
Website: The Guardian

(1907 Apr 23 – 1977 Jul 21) was best known as a fashion model and photographer. She was muse/model/lover to Edward Steichen and Man Ray, pals with Picasso and Jean Cocteau and provided her art studio oasis to Dubuffet, Moore and Ernst. Lee was also a brave photojournalist during WWII. A wife twice, a mother of one. Her son, Antony, has revived her work with ongoing exhibitions shown around the world.

Photo of Dorothy Miller Richardson

Dorothy Miller Richardson

(17 May 1873 – 17 June 1957) was a British author and journalist. Author of Pilgrimage, a sequence of 13 novels, she was one of the earliest modernist novelists to use stream of consciousness as a narrative technique. Richardson also emphasizes in Pilgrimage the importance and distinct nature of female experiences.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(17 May 1873 – 17 June 1957) was a British author and journalist. Author of Pilgrimage, a sequence of 13 novels, she was one of the earliest modernist novelists to use stream of consciousness as a narrative technique. Richardson also emphasizes in Pilgrimage the importance and distinct nature of female experiences.

Photo of Maria Mitchell

Maria Mitchell

(1818 Aug 1 – 1889 Jun 28; born in Nantucket, Maria studied astronomy as a girl. She was best known as the first female astronomer in the US and for her comet discovered in 1847, Miss Mitchell’s Comet. A professor of astronomy at Vassar, Maria co-founded the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1873.Read More
Website: Biography.com – Maria Mitchell

(1818 Aug 1 – 1889 Jun 28; born in Nantucket, Maria studied astronomy as a girl. She was best known as the first female astronomer in the US and for her comet discovered in 1847, Miss Mitchell’s Comet. A professor of astronomy at Vassar, Maria co-founded the Association for the Advancement of Women in 1873.