Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Consuelo Kanaga

Consuelo Kanaga

(15 May 1894 - 28 February 1978) was an American photographer and writer who became well known for her photographs of African-Americans. Her photography was championed by Edward Steichen, who included her in The Family of Man exhibition in 1955 and her photographs are now in the permanent exhibitions of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York.Read More
Website: New York Times

(15 May 1894 – 28 February 1978) was an American photographer and writer who became well known for her photographs of African-Americans. Her photography was championed by Edward Steichen, who included her in The Family of Man exhibition in 1955 and her photographs are now in the permanent exhibitions of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Photo of Anna Louise Karsch

Anna Louise Karsch

(1722 Dec 1 - 1791 Oct 12) was known as the German Sappho or “Die Karschin." Anna was the first German woman to live from the proceeds of her own literary work.” She taught herself to read in secret as her stepfather thought her obsessed with books. Married at 16, she had 3 children. By that third pregnancy, she filed for the first divorce in Prussia.…Read More
Website: Anna Louisa Karsch – Wikipedia

(1722 Dec 1 – 1791 Oct 12) was known as the German Sappho or “Die Karschin.” Anna was the first German woman to live from the proceeds of her own literary work.” She taught herself to read in secret as her stepfather thought her obsessed with books. Married at 16, she had 3 children. By that third pregnancy, she filed for the first divorce in Prussia. She then married a drunkard. Now a famous poetess, she used her influence to press him into military service, never to be seen again. Befriended by King Friedrich William II, he promised her a house and pension. After his death, she got just that. A poet to the end, she has been honored and commemorated throughout Germany.

Photo of Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King

(27 April 1927 – 30 January 2006) was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement and wife of Martin Luther King, Jr.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(27 April 1927 – 30 January 2006) was a leader in the American Civil Rights Movement and wife of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Photo of Florence King

Florence King

(1936 Jan 5 - 2016 Jan 6) wrote a column, “the Misanthrope’s Corner,” for the National Review magazine. She described herself as a “conservative lesbian feminist!” She was also referred to as “the World’s Funniest Bisexual Republican.” After retiring in 2006, she came back to NR with a new column, “The Bent Pin.” Some quotes: “Hell hath no fury like a liberal arts major scorned.” from Lump It or Leave It; from “Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady, “in the South, Sunday morning sex is always accompanied by church bells.” and “I don’t suffer fools and I like to see fools suffer.”Read More
Website: Florence King – Goodreads Quotes

(1936 Jan 5 – 2016 Jan 6) wrote a column, “the Misanthrope’s Corner,” for the National Review magazine. She described herself as a “conservative lesbian feminist!” She was also referred to as “the World’s Funniest Bisexual Republican.” After retiring in 2006, she came back to NR with a new column, “The Bent Pin.” Some quotes: “Hell hath no fury like a liberal arts major scorned.” from Lump It or Leave It; from “Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady, “in the South, Sunday morning sex is always accompanied by church bells.” and “I don’t suffer fools and I like to see fools suffer.”

Photo of Dr. Mary-Claire King

Dr. Mary-Claire King

( February 27, 1946) is the American Cancer Society Professor of Genome Sciences and of Medical Genetics in the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington. She studies human genetics and is particularly interested in genetic heterogeneity and complex traits. King is known for three major accomplishments: demonstrating that humans and chimpanzees are 99% genetically identical; identifying breast cancer genes; and applying genomic sequencing to identify victims of human rights abusesRead More

( February 27, 1946) is the American Cancer Society Professor of Genome Sciences and of Medical Genetics in the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington. She studies human genetics and is particularly interested in genetic heterogeneity and complex traits. King is known for three major accomplishments: demonstrating that humans and chimpanzees are 99% genetically identical; identifying breast cancer genes; and applying genomic sequencing to identify victims of human rights abuses

Photo of Dorothy Kingsley

Dorothy Kingsley

(1909 Oct 14 - 1997 Sept 26) wrote the screenplay to “Girl Crazy,” “Bathing Beauty,” “Kiss Me Kate” and “Angels in the Outfield”. Me either. Brought in as a “script doctor” Dorothy was often uncredited or her name was made minimal. When Harry Cohn was having a spat with Frank Sinatra over “Pal Joey” Dorothy was brought in to “fix” the synopsis, did such a great job that Frankie said okay and then agreed to do “Can-Can” as well.…Read More
Website: Dorothy Kingsley – Wikipedia

(1909 Oct 14 – 1997 Sept 26) wrote the screenplay to “Girl Crazy,” “Bathing Beauty,” “Kiss Me Kate” and “Angels in the
Outfield”. Me either. Brought in as a “script doctor” Dorothy was often uncredited or her name was made minimal. When Harry Cohn was having a spat with Frank Sinatra over “Pal Joey” Dorothy was brought in to “fix” the synopsis, did such a great job that Frankie said okay and then agreed to do “Can-Can” as well. Dorothy left Hollywood after 1969 and with her second husband Wm. Durney for Carmel where they started the Durney Vineyard. Planting in 1968, their first wines were produced in 1976. She had 6 kids.

Photo of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

(1896 Aug 8 - 1953 Dec 14) was a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist. Marjorie spent time in Wisconsin, Florida, New York, Washington and a few sojourns to Europe. The Yearling, her award-winning novel provided her with fame and wealth and established a writing style for young adults not seen before.Read More
Website: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings – Wikipedia

(1896 Aug 8 – 1953 Dec 14) was a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist. Marjorie spent time in Wisconsin, Florida, New York, Washington and a few sojourns to Europe. The Yearling, her award-winning novel provided her with fame and wealth and established a writing style for young adults not seen before.

Photo of Margaret Knight

Margaret Knight

(1838 Feb 14 - 1914 Oct 12) was the most famous 19th-century female inventor. She invented the paper bag with a flat bottom, as well as lid-removing pliers, a numbering machine, a window frame and sash, device and devices relating to rotary engines. She held 27 patents. Her original bag-making machine is in the Smithsonian.Read More
Website: Thought Co

(1838 Feb 14 – 1914 Oct 12) was the most famous 19th-century female inventor. She invented the paper bag with a flat bottom, as well as lid-removing pliers, a numbering machine, a window frame and sash, device and devices relating to rotary engines. She held 27 patents. Her original bag-making machine is in the Smithsonian.

Photo of Bertha Knight Landes

Bertha Knight Landes

(1868 Oct 19 - 1943 Nov 29) was the first female mayor of a major U.S. city - Seattle.Read More
Website: Bertha Knight Landes – Wikipedia

(1868 Oct 19 – 1943 Nov 29) was the first female mayor of a major U.S. city – Seattle.

Photo of Anna Komnene

Anna Komnene

(1083 Dec 1 - 1153) was a Byzantine princess, betrothed at birth, she married young. He died, so a new boy was chosen. Ambitious, Anna plotted to depose her much younger brother and take the throne for her husband. He disavowed the plot. He died. She was sent to a convent and wrote The Alexiad, a florid but historical account of her father, the emperor, his reign and his engagement with the First Crusade.…Read More
Website: Byzantium Meets The Crusaders

(1083 Dec 1 – 1153) was a Byzantine princess, betrothed at birth, she married young. He died, so a new boy was chosen. Ambitious, Anna plotted to depose her much younger brother and take the throne for her husband. He disavowed the plot. He died. She was sent to a convent and wrote The Alexiad, a florid but historical account of her father, the emperor, his reign and his engagement with the First Crusade. Used today to help define the attitudes of the time. Byzantium bureaucracy promoted education to men and women. Their economy thrived and lives flourished.

Photo of Opal Kunz

Opal Kunz

(1894 Nov 6 - 1967 May 15) was the first woman pilot to race with men. She taught young Navy cadets to fly for the war effort in 1942.Read More
Website: Opal Kunz – Wikipedia

(1894 Nov 6 – 1967 May 15) was the first woman pilot to race with men. She taught young Navy cadets to fly for the war effort in 1942.

Photo of Mary Lamb

Mary Lamb

(1764 Dec 3 - 1847 May 20) wrote children’s books, stabbed her mother to death while suffering a nervous breakdown, suffered from mental illness for the remainder of her life while presiding over literary salons in London with her brother, Charles (her writing partner and collaborator) and other notables---William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Hazlitt.…Read More
Website: Mary Lamb – Wikipedia

(1764 Dec 3 – 1847 May 20) wrote children’s books, stabbed her mother to death while suffering a nervous breakdown, suffered from mental illness for the remainder of her life while presiding over literary salons in London with her brother, Charles (her writing partner and collaborator) and other notables—William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Hazlitt. Realizing she could earn a living as a writer, Mary wrote Poems for Children, Mrs. Leicester’s School and Tales from Shakespeare (Shakespeare’s writings adapted for children). Her brother Charles and Mary vowed to care for one another for the remainder of their lives. Finally, at her end, she had deteriorated to what today would be referred to as dementia, Alzheimer’s, possibly schizophrenia.

Photo of Dorothea Lange

Dorothea Lange

(26 May 1895 - 11 October 1965) Her images of Depression-era America made her one of the most acclaimed documentary photographers of the 20th century. She is remembered above all for revealing the plight of sharecroppers, displaced farmers and migrant workers in the 1930s, and her portrait of Florence Owens Thompson, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California(1936), has become an icon of the period.Read More
Website: The Art Story

(26 May 1895 – 11 October 1965) Her images of Depression-era America made her one of the most acclaimed documentary photographers of the 20th century. She is remembered above all for revealing the plight of sharecroppers, displaced farmers and migrant workers in the 1930s, and her portrait of Florence Owens Thompson, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California(1936), has become an icon of the period.

Photo of Emma Lazarus

Emma Lazarus

(July 22, 1849 – November 19, 1887) was an American poet born in New York City. She is best known for "The New Colossus" a sonnet written in 1883; its lines appear inscribed on a bronze plaque in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty installed in 1903 a decade and a half after Lazarus's death.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(July 22, 1849 – November 19, 1887) was an American poet born in New York City.
She is best known for “The New Colossus” a sonnet written in 1883; its lines appear inscribed on a bronze plaque in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty installed in 1903 a decade and a half after Lazarus’s death.

Photo of Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz

(born 1949 Oct 2) in Waterbury, Connecticut, is currently considered one of the greatest portrait photographers in the world. In 1973 she began work for "Rolling Stone" magazine. Ten years later she’d shot 142 covers. She went on to "Vanity Fair" and "Vogue" shooting award-winning campaigns and collaborating with ABT, BAM, Mark Morris, Mikhail Baryshnikow and more.…Read More

(born 1949 Oct 2) in Waterbury, Connecticut, is currently considered one of the greatest portrait photographers in the world. In 1973 she began work for “Rolling Stone” magazine. Ten years later she’d shot 142 covers. She went on to “Vanity Fair” and “Vogue” shooting award-winning campaigns and collaborating with ABT, BAM, Mark Morris, Mikhail Baryshnikow and
more. She had her first kid at 52. With a surrogate, she had twins. She lived with Susan Sontag from 1989 until Susan’s death in 2004.

Photo of Denise Levertov

Denise Levertov

(24 October 1923 - 20 December 1997) was a poet, described as "fitted by birth and political destiny to voice the terrors and pleasures of the twentieth century.  Her poems spoke of great contemporary themes: Eros, solitude, community, war. She wrote and published 24 books of poetry, and among her many awards and honours, she received the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Frost Medal.…Read More
Website: Poetry Foundation

(24 October 1923 – 20 December 1997) was a poet, described as “fitted by birth and political destiny to voice the terrors and pleasures of the twentieth century.  Her poems spoke of great contemporary themes: Eros, solitude, community, war. She wrote and published 24 books of poetry, and among her many awards and honours, she received the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Frost Medal. and a grant from the National Institute of Artis and Letters and a Guggenehim Fellowship.  

Photo of Maya Lin

Maya Lin

(born 1959 Oct 5), from Athens, Ohio, architect and sculptor Maya Lin was born. In 1980, Maya entered a nationwide competition to design a monument in honor of those who served and died in the Vietnam War. She took first prize. It was to be built in the National Mall in Washington, D.C. A polished, V-shaped, granite wall.…Read More
Website: Maya Lin – Biography.com

(born 1959 Oct 5), from Athens, Ohio, architect and sculptor Maya Lin was born. In 1980, Maya entered a nationwide competition to design a monument in honor of those who served and died in the Vietnam War. She took first prize. It was to be built in the National Mall in Washington, D.C. A polished, V-shaped, granite wall. Each side measuring 247 feet, simply inscribed with the names of the more than 58,000 soldiers killed or missing in action listed in order of death or disappearance. Incredible controversy ensued with Vietnam vets calling it a “black gash of shame.” The wall was dedicated in 1982. Today, more than 10,000 people a day visit this monument. Maya has created many pieces all over the United States. In 2016, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama. Her simplicity and provocative designs inspire introspection and powerful emotions.

Photo of Henrietta Locke

Henrietta Locke

(August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951) (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson). Her immortal DNA is helping to cure ovarian cancer. She was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 1, 1920 – October 4, 1951) (sometimes erroneously called Henrietta Lakes, Helen Lane or Helen Larson). Her immortal DNA is helping to cure ovarian cancer. She was an African-American woman who was the unwitting source of cells (from her cancerous tumor) which were cultured by George Otto Gey to create the first known human immortal cell line for medical research.

Photo of Belva Lockwood

Belva Lockwood

(October 24, 1830 – May 19, 1917). Tried to run for U.S. President, 1884.  She was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women's rights. The press of her day referred to her as a "suffragist.” Lockwood overcame many social and personal obstacles related to gender restrictions.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 24, 1830 – May 19, 1917). Tried to run for U.S. President, 1884.  She was an American attorney, politician, educator, and author. She was active in working for women’s rights. The press of her day referred to her as a “suffragist.” Lockwood overcame many social and personal obstacles related to gender restrictions. After college, she worked to equalize pay for women in education.

Photo of Louise Mack

Louise Mack

(1870 Oct 10 - 1935 Nov 23) was born in Tasmania, Miss Louise Mack was the first woman war correspondent (WWI) for London’s the Daily Mail and Evening News. She wrote poems as a girl, published young adult books as a teen and adult novels as a young woman. Louise moved to Florence and took on the editorship of the Italian Gazette.…Read More
Website: Poem Hunter – Biography

(1870 Oct 10 – 1935 Nov 23) was born in Tasmania, Miss Louise Mack was the first woman war correspondent (WWI) for London’s the Daily Mail and Evening News. She wrote poems as a girl, published young adult books as a teen and adult novels as a young woman. Louise moved to Florence and took on the editorship of the Italian Gazette. Lord Northcliffe hired her for his London papers. Disguised as a housemaid and stationed in Antwerp, Louise sent on-the-spot accounts of the advancing German occupation. Imminent danger forced her to escape to Holland and her book, A Woman’s Experiences in the Great War. Back in Australia, she raised money for the Red Cross, and met and married Allen Leyland. Following his early death, Louise resumed traveling and writing for newspapers and magazines and published two more books. She died in 1935.