Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Nelly Furtado

Nelly Furtado

(born 1978 Dec 2) is a Portuguese-Canadian singer/songwriter. By age 12, Furtado could play the trombone, ukulele, guitar and keyboards. She started writing songs and performed in a marching band. She worked as a chambermaid for eight summers. She has won 60 music awards including a Grammy, a Latin Grammy, a Billboard, Juno and ASCAP. Once hired for $1 million to perform for Muammar Khaddafi, she donated all of it to Feed the Children.Read More
Website: Nelly Furtado – Wikipedia

(born 1978 Dec 2) is a Portuguese-Canadian singer/songwriter. By age 12, Furtado could play the trombone, ukulele, guitar and keyboards. She started writing songs and performed in a marching band. She worked as a chambermaid for eight summers. She has won 60 music awards including a Grammy, a Latin Grammy, a Billboard, Juno and ASCAP. Once hired for $1 million to perform for Muammar Khaddafi, she donated all of it to Feed the Children.

Photo of Zona Gale

Zona Gale

(August 26, 1874 – December 27, 1938) - After college, Gale wrote for newspapers in Milwaukee and New York City, for six years.  She published her first novel, Romance Island, in 1906, and began the very popular series of "Friendship Village" stories.  …Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 26, 1874 – December 27, 1938) – After college, Gale wrote for newspapers in Milwaukee and New York City, for six years.  She published her first novel, Romance Island, in 1906, and began the very popular series of “Friendship Village” stories.  In 1920, she published the novel Miss Lulu Bett, which depicts life in the Midwestern United States. She adapted it as a play, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1921  First woman to win Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Photo of Letitia Geer

Letitia Geer

(1852 - 1935 Jul 18), she invented the one-handed operated push syringe. Her syringe is the basis of most modern medical syringes.Read More
Website: Letitia Geer – Wikipedia

(1852 – 1935 Jul 18), she invented the one-handed operated push syringe. Her syringe is the basis of most modern medical syringes.

Photo of Yevgenia Ginzburg

Yevgenia Ginzburg

(December 20, 1904  – May 25, 1977) - She was a teacher and journalist. She was arrested in an anti-communist round up,10 years were spent in a labor camp in remote Siberia. She survived to write memoirs of her time in the gulag, Journey into the Whirlwind (1967) and Within the Whirlwind (1979).  …Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(December 20, 1904  – May 25, 1977) – She was a teacher and journalist. She was arrested in an anti-communist round up,10 years were spent in a labor camp in remote Siberia. She survived to write memoirs of her time in the gulag, Journey into the Whirlwind (1967) and Within the Whirlwind (1979).  After becoming a Communist Party member, Ginzburg continued her successful career as educator, journalist and administrator.

Photo of Salome Gluecksohn-Waelsch

Salome Gluecksohn-Waelsch

(1907 Oct 6 - 2007 Nov 7) For over 60 years, Salome Gluecksohn Waelsch made fundamental discoveries in mammalian development and cancer research. Growing up in Danzig, Germany, she overcame horrific and ridiculous anti-semitic, anti-women obstacles. In 1933, after receiving her Ph.D in biology, she and her first husband fled Hitler’s Germany to the US. Working first as an unpaid developmental neurobiologist, Salome began work as a geneticist and embryologist, and published her first paper on the genes involved in forming the mouse embryo.…Read More
Website: Jewish Women’s Archive Encyclopedia

(1907 Oct 6 – 2007 Nov 7) For over 60 years, Salome Gluecksohn Waelsch made fundamental discoveries in mammalian development and cancer research. Growing up in Danzig, Germany, she overcame horrific and ridiculous anti-semitic, anti-women obstacles. In 1933, after receiving her Ph.D in biology, she and her first husband fled Hitler’s Germany to the US. Working first as
an unpaid developmental neurobiologist, Salome began work as a geneticist and embryologist, and published her first paper on the genes involved in forming the mouse embryo. In 1955, for the newly formed Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Waelsch found a place that accepted her as a woman, a Jew and a scientist. She became the chair of the genetics department in 1963.
Above her desk, photographs of Albert Einstein and Lillian Hellman. Salome had two children with Waelsch.

Photo of Midori Goto

Midori Goto

(born 1971 Oct 25) is a violinist and the 2007 UN Messenger of Peace. At six, her first violin concert in her native Osaka. Six! She moved, with her mother to New York. Studied at Juilliard Pre-College; made her concert debut with the NY Philharmonic at age 11. At 15, she became a full-time professional violinist.…Read More
Website: Midori Goto

(born 1971 Oct 25) is a violinist and the 2007 UN Messenger of Peace. At six, her first violin concert in her native Osaka. Six! She moved, with her mother to New York. Studied at Juilliard Pre-College; made her concert debut with the NY Philharmonic at age 11. At 15, she became a full-time professional violinist. At 22, she gave her debut recital at Carnegie Hall. She also formed her non-profit organization, Midori and Friends, to bring music education and opportunities to children in NY and Japan. Over the next few years, Midori started three more non-profits; won numerous awards, honorary degrees and chairs; and graduated from NYU with a degree in psychology. She resides in LA and teaches at USC’s Thornton School of Music.

Photo of Christine Granville

Christine Granville

 (Maria Krystyna Janina Skarbek) - (1 May 1908 - 15 June 1952) was a Polish agent of the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) during the Second World War. She became celebrated especially for her daring exploits in intelligence and irregular-warfare missions in Nazi-occupied Poland and France.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

 (Maria Krystyna Janina Skarbek) – (1 May 1908 – 15 June 1952) was a Polish agent of the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) during the Second World War. She became celebrated especially for her daring exploits in intelligence and irregular-warfare missions in Nazi-occupied Poland and France. She became a British agent months before the SOE was founded in July 1940 and was one of the longest-serving of all Britain’s wartime women agents.

Photo of Rebecca Gratz

Rebecca Gratz

(1781 Mar 4 - 1869 Aug 27) was born to a prominent Jewish family. At the age of 20, she established the Female Association for the Relief of Women and Children in Reduced Circumstances for women and families after the American Revolution. Rebecca founded the Philadelphia Orphan Asylum and the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society. She became Superintendent and President of the Hebrew Sunday School and assisted in developing its curriculum.…Read More
Website: Jewish Women’s Association – Rebecca Gratz

(1781 Mar 4 – 1869 Aug 27) was born to a prominent Jewish family. At the age of 20, she established the Female Association for the Relief of Women and Children in Reduced Circumstances for women and families after the American Revolution. Rebecca founded the Philadelphia Orphan Asylum and the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society. She became Superintendent and President of the Hebrew Sunday School and assisted in developing its curriculum. Five years of advocacy, and a Jewish Foster Home was established. Philanthropy and charitable works were the hallmarks of this woman’s life. She was inspiration for Sir Walter Scott’s character, Rebecca, in Ivanhoe.

Photo of Shirley Ann Grau

Shirley Ann Grau

(born July 28, 1929) is an American writer. She was born in New Orleans, and her work is set primarily in the Deep South, and explores issues of race and gender. She lived during much of her childhood in and around Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with her mother. She graduated in 1950 from Newcomb College, the women's coordinate college of Tulane University.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born July 28, 1929) is an American writer. She was born in New Orleans, and her work is set primarily in the Deep South, and explores issues of race and gender. She lived during much of her childhood in and around Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with her mother. She graduated in 1950 from Newcomb College, the women’s coordinate college of Tulane University.

Photo of Malvina Guimaraes

Malvina Guimaraes

(1820 - 5 Oct 1882) was a businesswoman who successfully marketed American sewing machines to South America. She previously owned the Oswego Elks Lodge building.Read More
Website: “Rags To Riches Tale Of Oswego Woman Told In New Book”

(1820 – 5 Oct 1882) was a businesswoman who successfully marketed American sewing machines to South America. She previously owned the Oswego Elks Lodge building.

Photo of Caroly Guzy

Caroly Guzy

(7 March 1956 -) is an American news photographer who has won the Pulitzer Prize 4 times--the only journalist with that achievement. Her documentary photography is praised for its emotional depth and her talent for illustrating hope in communities caught in conflict or disaster--such as refugees in Kosovo or earthquake victims in Haiti.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(7 March 1956 -) is an American news photographer who has won the Pulitzer Prize 4 times–the only journalist with that achievement. Her documentary photography is praised for its emotional depth and her talent for illustrating hope in communities caught in conflict or disaster–such as refugees in Kosovo or earthquake victims in Haiti.

Photo of Emily Hahn

Emily Hahn

(January 14, 1905 – February 18, 1997) was an American journalist and author. Called "a forgotten American literary treasure" by The New Yorker magazine, she was the author of 52 books and more than 180 articles and stories.  In 1926, she became one of the first women to get an engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(January 14, 1905 – February 18, 1997) was an American journalist and author. Called “a forgotten American literary treasure” by The New Yorker magazine, she was the author of 52 books and more than 180 articles and stories.  In 1926, she became one of the first women to get an engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Photo of Lorraine Hansberry

Lorraine Hansberry

(1930 May 19 - 1965 Jan 12) was a playwright and activist. Lorraine wrote “A Raisin in the Sun,” worked for and contributed to the NAACP; married; was the first black playwright to win a NY Critics’ Circle award.Read More
Website: Biography.com – Lorraine Hansberry

(1930 May 19 – 1965 Jan 12) was a playwright and activist. Lorraine wrote “A Raisin in the Sun,” worked for and contributed to the NAACP; married; was the first black playwright to win a NY Critics’ Circle award.

Photo of Clarissa (Clara) Harlowe Barton

Clarissa (Clara) Harlowe Barton

(December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was a pioneering nurse who founded the American Red Cross. She was a hospital nurse in the American Civil War, a teacher, and patent clerk. Barton is noteworthy for doing humanitarian work at a time when relatively few women worked outside the home. She had a relationship with John J.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was a pioneering nurse who founded the American Red Cross. She was a hospital nurse in the American Civil War, a teacher, and patent clerk. Barton is noteworthy for doing humanitarian work at a time when relatively few women worked outside the home. She had a relationship with John J. Elwell, but never married.

Photo of Mary Harris Jones

Mary Harris Jones

(Mother Jones) - (1837 - 1930) - She was an Irish-American schoolteacher and dressmaker who helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. Her dress shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, so she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(Mother Jones) – (1837 – 1930) – She was an Irish-American schoolteacher and dressmaker who helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. Her dress shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, so she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union. She was called “the most dangerous woman in America” for her success in organizing mine workers against the mine owners.

Photo of Anna Mae Hays

Anna Mae Hays

(16 February 1920 - 7 January 2018) was a front-line nurse who was named the United States military’s first female general after serving in three wars.  She paved a career path for other women by recommending that married officers who become pregnant should not face compulsory discharge, and that appointments to the Army Nurse Corps Reserve not depend on the age of the applicant’s children.…Read More
Website: New York Times

(16 February 1920 – 7 January 2018) was a front-line nurse who was named the United States military’s first female general after serving in three wars.  She paved a career path for other women by recommending that married officers who become pregnant should not face compulsory discharge, and that appointments to the Army Nurse Corps Reserve not depend on the age of the applicant’s children. She also widened educational opportunities for nurses, deployed more of them overseas and imposed stricter academic standards for admitting them.

Photo of Margaret Heafield Hamilton

Margaret Heafield Hamilton

(born August 17, 1936) is a computer scientist, systems engineer and business owner. She was Director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which developed on-board flight software for the Apollo space program.In 1986, she became the founder and CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The company was developed around the Universal Systems Language based on her paradigm of Development Before the Fact (DBTF) for systems and software designRead More
Website: Wikipedia

(born August 17, 1936) is a computer scientist, systems engineer and business owner. She was Director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which developed on-board flight software for the Apollo space program.In 1986, she became the founder and CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The company was developed around the Universal Systems Language based on her paradigm of Development Before the Fact (DBTF) for systems and software design

Photo of Anna Held

Anna Held

(1872 Mar 8 - 1918 Aug 12) known as the Swedish Nightingale, French performer Anna Held was born in Poland. Pogroms forced her family to flee to Paris. She sang in Jewish theatres. In London it was her petite figure, her risqué songs and flirtatious nature that rocked her audiences. Flo Ziegfeld convinced her to sail to America.…Read More
Website: Jewish Women’s Association – Anna Held

(1872 Mar 8 – 1918 Aug 12) known as the Swedish Nightingale, French performer Anna Held was born in Poland. Pogroms forced her family to flee to Paris. She sang in Jewish theatres. In London it was her petite figure, her risqué songs and flirtatious nature that rocked her audiences. Flo Ziegfeld convinced her to sail to America. On board, he sent telegrams that she’d removed ribs to maintain her 18-inch waist (corseted and painfully tiny) and that she bathed in gallons of milk. She became the first “branded” performer, and audiences flocked to her shows. Anna endorsed everything from cigars, to soap. In January, 1918, while touring her show” she became unwell. She checked into the Savoy Hotel in New York City, where, on August 12, she died of multiple myeloma. Forty-six years old and worth one million dollars (17 million today).

Photo of Barbara Hepworth

Barbara Hepworth

(1903 Jan 10 - 1975 May 20) - taking space away from art rather than adding to it was Dame Barbara Hepworth’s marvelous artistic outlook. The first to use holes to “pierce” her sculptures Barbara’s lifelong contemporary and competitor, Henry Moore, seems to have gotten the lion’s share of fame and recognition. However, once you see Hepworth’s work, you sense the tension and the calm all in one look, one breath.…Read More

(1903 Jan 10 – 1975 May 20) – taking space away from art rather than adding to it was Dame Barbara Hepworth’s marvelous artistic outlook. The first to use holes to “pierce” her sculptures Barbara’s lifelong contemporary and competitor, Henry Moore, seems to have gotten the lion’s share of fame and recognition. However, once you see Hepworth’s work, you sense the tension and the calm all in one look, one breath. This female artist, internationally known, revered and commissioned, is considered one of the greatest sculptors of the 20th century.

Photo of Octavia Hill

Octavia Hill

(1838 Dec 3 - 1912 Aug 13) with friend John Ruskin, they were the moving force behind social housing and open spaces for poor people in London. Octavia believed that natural environments were “life-enhancing.” She helped create the National Trust (to preserve places of historic interest or natural beauty). Pioneered home-visiting services (forming the basis for modern social work).…Read More
Website: Octavia Hill – Wikipedia

(1838 Dec 3 – 1912 Aug 13) with friend John Ruskin, they were the moving force behind social housing and open spaces for poor people in London. Octavia believed that natural environments were “life-enhancing.” She helped create the National Trust (to preserve places of historic interest or natural beauty). Pioneered home-visiting services (forming the basis for modern social work). Was the first person to use the term, “Green Belt.” Reformed slum and poverty laws. Disavowed suffrage (women and men help one another because of their differences), and social service/old age pensions (the government does more harm than good, sapping people’s self-reliance).