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Directory 2018-11-25T09:49:31+00:00

Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Marguerite Donnadieu

Marguerite Donnadieu

Known as Marguerite Duras (French: [maʁ.ɡə.ʁit dy.ʁas]; 4 April 1914 – 3 March 1996), was a French novelist, playwright, scriptwriter, essayist and experimental filmmaker. She is best known for writing the 1959 film Hiroshima mon amour, which earned her a nomination for Best Original Screenplay at the Academy Awards.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

Known as Marguerite Duras (French: [maʁ.ɡə.ʁit dy.ʁas]; 4 April 1914 – 3 March 1996), was a French novelist, playwright, scriptwriter, essayist and experimental filmmaker. She is best known for writing the 1959 film Hiroshima mon amour, which earned her a nomination for Best Original Screenplay at the Academy Awards.

Photo of Marie Duplessis

Marie Duplessis

(15 January 1824 – 3 February 1847). Her father forced her into prostitution around the age of 13 in order to bring in money for the family. She was a French courtesan and mistress to a number of prominent and wealthy men. Much of what is known about her has been derived from the literary persona and contemporary legends.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(15 January 1824 – 3 February 1847). Her father forced her into prostitution around the age of 13 in order to bring in money for the family. She was a French courtesan and mistress to a number of prominent and wealthy men. Much of what is known about her has been derived from the literary persona and contemporary legends. She has been the inspiration for many books, plays, and films.

Photo of Gertrude Belle Elion

Gertrude Belle Elion

(January 23, 1918 – February 21, 1999) was an American biochemist and pharmacologist, who shared the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with George H. Hitchings and Sir James Black.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(January 23, 1918 – February 21, 1999) was an American biochemist and pharmacologist, who shared the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with George H. Hitchings and Sir James Black. Working alone as well as with Hitchings and Black, Elion developed a multitude of new drugs, using innovative research methods that would later lead to the development of the AIDS drug AZT.

Photo of Annelies (Anne) Marie Frank

Annelies (Anne) Marie Frank

(June 12, 1929 – February or March 1945) was a German-born diarist. One of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust, she gained fame posthumously following the publication of The Diary of a Young Girl , in which she documents her life in hiding from 1942 to 1944, during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(June 12, 1929 – February or March 1945) was a German-born diarist. One of the most discussed Jewish victims of the Holocaust, she gained fame posthumously following the publication of The Diary of a Young Girl , in which she documents her life in hiding from 1942 to 1944, during the German occupation of the Netherlands in World War II. It is one of the world’s most widely known books, translated into over 60 languages, and has been the basis for several plays and films.

Photo of Mariella Frostrup

Mariella Frostrup

(born Oslo, Norway, 12 November 1962) is a UK based journalist and television presenter, well known on British TV and radio, mainly for arts programmes. Her 'gravelly' voice was voted the sexiest female voice on TV was one of three voices (narrowed from fifty) best suited to contribute to a Post Office Telecoms study resulting in a perfect female voice".…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born Oslo, Norway, 12 November 1962) is a UK based journalist and television presenter, well known on British TV and radio, mainly for arts programmes. Her ‘gravelly’ voice was voted the sexiest female voice on TV was one of three voices (narrowed from fifty) best suited to contribute to a Post Office Telecoms study resulting in a perfect female voice”. Her voice is often used on TV commercials.”

Photo of Zona Gale

Zona Gale

(August 26, 1874 – December 27, 1938) - After college, Gale wrote for newspapers in Milwaukee and New York City, for six years.  She published her first novel, Romance Island, in 1906, and began the very popular series of "Friendship Village" stories.  …Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 26, 1874 – December 27, 1938) – After college, Gale wrote for newspapers in Milwaukee and New York City, for six years.  She published her first novel, Romance Island, in 1906, and began the very popular series of “Friendship Village” stories.  In 1920, she published the novel Miss Lulu Bett, which depicts life in the Midwestern United States. She adapted it as a play, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1921  First woman to win Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Photo of Yevgenia Ginzburg

Yevgenia Ginzburg

(December 20, 1904  – May 25, 1977) - She was a teacher and journalist. She was arrested in an anti-communist round up,10 years were spent in a labor camp in remote Siberia. She survived to write memoirs of her time in the gulag, Journey into the Whirlwind (1967) and Within the Whirlwind (1979).  …Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(December 20, 1904  – May 25, 1977) – She was a teacher and journalist. She was arrested in an anti-communist round up,10 years were spent in a labor camp in remote Siberia. She survived to write memoirs of her time in the gulag, Journey into the Whirlwind (1967) and Within the Whirlwind (1979).  After becoming a Communist Party member, Ginzburg continued her successful career as educator, journalist and administrator.

Photo of Christine Granville

Christine Granville

 (Maria Krystyna Janina Skarbek) - (1 May 1908 - 15 June 1952) was a Polish agent of the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) during the Second World War. She became celebrated especially for her daring exploits in intelligence and irregular-warfare missions in Nazi-occupied Poland and France.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

 (Maria Krystyna Janina Skarbek) – (1 May 1908 – 15 June 1952) was a Polish agent of the British Special Operations Executive (SOE) during the Second World War. She became celebrated especially for her daring exploits in intelligence and irregular-warfare missions in Nazi-occupied Poland and France. She became a British agent months before the SOE was founded in July 1940 and was one of the longest-serving of all Britain’s wartime women agents.

Photo of Shirley Ann Grau

Shirley Ann Grau

(born July 28, 1929) is an American writer. She was born in New Orleans, and her work is set primarily in the Deep South, and explores issues of race and gender. She lived during much of her childhood in and around Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with her mother. She graduated in 1950 from Newcomb College, the women's coordinate college of Tulane University.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born July 28, 1929) is an American writer. She was born in New Orleans, and her work is set primarily in the Deep South, and explores issues of race and gender. She lived during much of her childhood in and around Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with her mother. She graduated in 1950 from Newcomb College, the women’s coordinate college of Tulane University.

Photo of Caroly Guzy

Caroly Guzy

(7 March 1956 -) is an American news photographer who has won the Pulitzer Prize 4 times--the only journalist with that achievement. Her documentary photography is praised for its emotional depth and her talent for illustrating hope in communities caught in conflict or disaster--such as refugees in Kosovo or earthquake victims in Haiti.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(7 March 1956 -) is an American news photographer who has won the Pulitzer Prize 4 times–the only journalist with that achievement. Her documentary photography is praised for its emotional depth and her talent for illustrating hope in communities caught in conflict or disaster–such as refugees in Kosovo or earthquake victims in Haiti.

Photo of Emily Hahn

Emily Hahn

(January 14, 1905 – February 18, 1997) was an American journalist and author. Called "a forgotten American literary treasure" by The New Yorker magazine, she was the author of 52 books and more than 180 articles and stories.  In 1926, she became one of the first women to get an engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(January 14, 1905 – February 18, 1997) was an American journalist and author. Called “a forgotten American literary treasure” by The New Yorker magazine, she was the author of 52 books and more than 180 articles and stories.  In 1926, she became one of the first women to get an engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Photo of Clarissa (Clara) Harlowe Barton

Clarissa (Clara) Harlowe Barton

(December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was a pioneering nurse who founded the American Red Cross. She was a hospital nurse in the American Civil War, a teacher, and patent clerk. Barton is noteworthy for doing humanitarian work at a time when relatively few women worked outside the home. She had a relationship with John J.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(December 25, 1821 – April 12, 1912) was a pioneering nurse who founded the American Red Cross. She was a hospital nurse in the American Civil War, a teacher, and patent clerk. Barton is noteworthy for doing humanitarian work at a time when relatively few women worked outside the home. She had a relationship with John J. Elwell, but never married.

Photo of Mary Harris Jones

Mary Harris Jones

(Mother Jones) - (1837 - 1930) - She was an Irish-American schoolteacher and dressmaker who helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. Her dress shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, so she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(Mother Jones) – (1837 – 1930) – She was an Irish-American schoolteacher and dressmaker who helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. Her dress shop was destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, so she began working as an organizer for the Knights of Labor and the United Mine Workers union. She was called “the most dangerous woman in America” for her success in organizing mine workers against the mine owners.

Photo of Anna Mae Hays

Anna Mae Hays

(16 February 1920 - 7 January 2018) was a front-line nurse who was named the United States military’s first female general after serving in three wars.  She paved a career path for other women by recommending that married officers who become pregnant should not face compulsory discharge, and that appointments to the Army Nurse Corps Reserve not depend on the age of the applicant’s children.…Read More
Website: New York Times

(16 February 1920 – 7 January 2018) was a front-line nurse who was named the United States military’s first female general after serving in three wars.  She paved a career path for other women by recommending that married officers who become pregnant should not face compulsory discharge, and that appointments to the Army Nurse Corps Reserve not depend on the age of the applicant’s children. She also widened educational opportunities for nurses, deployed more of them overseas and imposed stricter academic standards for admitting them.

Photo of Margaret Heafield Hamilton

Margaret Heafield Hamilton

(born August 17, 1936) is a computer scientist, systems engineer and business owner. She was Director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which developed on-board flight software for the Apollo space program.In 1986, she became the founder and CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The company was developed around the Universal Systems Language based on her paradigm of Development Before the Fact (DBTF) for systems and software designRead More
Website: Wikipedia

(born August 17, 1936) is a computer scientist, systems engineer and business owner. She was Director of the Software Engineering Division of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory, which developed on-board flight software for the Apollo space program.In 1986, she became the founder and CEO of Hamilton Technologies, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The company was developed around the Universal Systems Language based on her paradigm of Development Before the Fact (DBTF) for systems and software design

Photo of Jacki Hill-Murphy

Jacki Hill-Murphy

Hill-Murphyis about as far removed from the stereotypical rugged Viking explorer as is humanly possible. But she has not only travelled to the world's’ most inhospitable places, in doing so she’s retraced the steps of some little-known - but no less extraordinary – women, who were blazing a trail 300 years ago.Read More
Website: Article

Hill-Murphyis about as far removed from the stereotypical rugged Viking explorer as is humanly possible. But she has not only travelled to the world’s’ most inhospitable places, in doing so she’s retraced the steps of some little-known – but no less extraordinary – women, who were blazing a trail 300 years ago.

Photo of Elizabeth Holloway Marston

Elizabeth Holloway Marston

(February 20, 1893 – March 27, 1993) was an American psychologist. She was involved in various ways in the creation of the comic book character Wonder Woman in the early 1940s with her husband, William Moulton Marston (pen name Charles Moulton). She also participated with Marston in the development of the systolic blood-pressure test used to detect deception.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(February 20, 1893 – March 27, 1993) was an American psychologist. She was involved in various ways in the creation of the comic book character Wonder Woman in the early 1940s with her husband, William Moulton Marston (pen name Charles Moulton). She also participated with Marston in the development of the systolic blood-pressure test used to detect deception.

Photo of Minerva Hoyt

Minerva Hoyt

(27 March 1866 - 15 December 1945) founded the International Deserts Conservation League and worked with Franklin Delano Roosevelt's administration to establish the Joshua Tree National Monument, as well as helping preserve parts of Death Valley and Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.Read More
Website: National Park Service

(27 March 1866 – 15 December 1945) founded the International Deserts Conservation League and worked with Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s administration to establish the Joshua Tree National Monument, as well as helping preserve parts of Death Valley and Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.

Photo of Margaret Hughes

Margaret Hughes

In 1660, a professional female actress appeared on the English stage in a production of Othello. It's one of the earliest known instances of a female role actually being played by a woman in an English production. Up until this time, women were considered too fine and sensitive for the rough life of the theater, and boys or men dressed in drag to play female characters.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

In 1660, a professional female actress appeared on the English stage in a production of Othello. It’s one of the earliest known instances of a female role actually being played by a woman in an English production. Up until this time, women were considered too fine and sensitive for the rough life of the theater, and boys or men dressed in drag to play female characters. An earlier attempt to form co-ed theater troupes was met with jeers and hisses and thrown produce. But by the second half of the 17th century, the King’s Company felt that London society could handle it. Before the production, a lengthy disclaimer in iambic pentameter was delivered to the audience, warning them that they were about to see an actual woman in the part. This was, the actor explained, because they felt that men were just too big and burly to play the more delicate roles, With bone so large and nerve so incompliant / When you call Desdemona enter giant.”

Photo of Anne Hutchinson

Anne Hutchinson

(1591–1643) Religious protestor and founder of Rhode Island. A Puritan spiritual adviser and a mother of 15. Her strong religious convictions were at odds with the established Puritan clergy in the Boston area, and her popularity and charisma helped create a theological schism that threatened to destroy the Puritans' religious experiment in New England. She was eventually tried and convicted, then banished from the colony.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(1591–1643) Religious protestor and founder of Rhode Island. A Puritan spiritual adviser and a mother of 15. Her strong religious convictions were at odds with the established Puritan clergy in the Boston area, and her popularity and charisma helped create a theological schism that threatened to destroy the Puritans’ religious experiment in New England. She was eventually tried and convicted, then banished from the colony.

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