Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Harriet Powers

Harriet Powers

(October 29, 1837 – January 1, 1910) was an African-American slave, folk artist, and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Only two of her quilts are known to have survived: Bible Quilt 1886 and Pictorial Quilt 1898. Her quilts are considered among the finest examples of nineteenth-century Southern quilting.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 29, 1837 – January 1, 1910) was an African-American slave, folk artist, and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Only two of her quilts are known to have survived: Bible Quilt 1886 and Pictorial Quilt 1898. Her quilts are considered among the finest examples of nineteenth-century Southern quilting. Her work is on display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts.

Photo of Michele Pred

Michele Pred

Michele Pred is a Swedish-American conceptual artist. She works with found and confiscated objects and technology imbued with cultural and political meaning. Her artwork has been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums in London, Stockholm, Sydney, New York, Bologna, Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. Her work is part of the permanent collection at the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, the 21st Century Museum,Read More
Website: Website

Michele Pred is a Swedish-American conceptual artist. She works with found and confiscated objects and technology imbued with cultural and political meaning. Her artwork has been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums in London, Stockholm, Sydney, New York, Bologna, Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. Her work is part of the permanent collection at the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, the 21st Century Museum,

Photo of Francis Preston

Francis Preston

(1986 until 2004) Preston served as President and CEO of BMI from 1986 until 2004. Divorced secretary who turned bmi into a multi-million dollar organization. Helped pave the way for royalty rights in the music industry. The Nashville native nurtured the careers of thousands of songwriters, performers and publishers in all musical genres during her career at BMI, which spanned six decades.Read More
Website: Memorial

(1986 until 2004) Preston served as President and CEO of BMI from 1986 until 2004. Divorced secretary who turned bmi into a multi-million dollar organization. Helped pave the way for royalty rights in the music industry. The Nashville native nurtured the careers of thousands of songwriters, performers and publishers in all musical genres during her career at BMI, which spanned six decades.

Photo of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt

(/ˈɛlᵻnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.President Harry S.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(/ˈɛlᵻnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.President Harry S. Truman later called her the First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rights achievements. “

Photo of Martha Roundtree

Martha Roundtree

(October 23, 1911 – August 23, 1999) was an American pioneering broadcast journalist and entrepreneur. She was the creator and first moderator of a public-affairs program, first on radio as The American Mercury from June 24, 1945, and as Meet the Press on the NBC television network from November 6, 1947. She remains the only female moderator in the over-six-decade history of the show.Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(October 23, 1911 – August 23, 1999) was an American pioneering broadcast journalist and entrepreneur. She was the creator and first moderator of a public-affairs program, first on radio as The American Mercury from June 24, 1945, and as Meet the Press on the NBC television network from November 6, 1947. She remains the only female moderator in the over-six-decade history of the show.

Photo of Diana E.H. Russell

Diana E.H. Russell

(born 1938 Nov 6) is a teacher, feminist, writer, and outspoken speaker on sexual violence against women and girls. Raised in Cape Town, South Africa, her earliest involvement with anti-apartheid and humane causes has never left her. She was in a peaceful protest, and arrested. The brutal and uber-violence of the white Afrikaner police state could not by stopped by peaceful methods.…Read More
Website: Diana E.H. Russell – Wikipedia

(born 1938 Nov 6) is a teacher, feminist, writer, and outspoken speaker on sexual violence against women and girls. Raised in Cape Town, South Africa, her earliest involvement with anti-apartheid and humane causes has never left her. She was in a peaceful protest, and arrested. The brutal and uber-violence of the white Afrikaner police state could not by stopped by peaceful methods. To this day, she still risks jail if she returns to Cape Town. In 1969, moving to the US, Diana taught Sociology at UC San Francisco, and Mills College, introducing one of the first women’s studies courses in the US. In 1976, Diana redefined femicide as “the killing of females by males, because they are female.” Diana speaks and writes still and has been the recipient of many awards and honorariums.

Photo of Frederica Sagor Maas

Frederica Sagor Maas

(July 6, 1900 – January 5, 2012) was an American dramatist and playwright, screenwriter, memoirist, and author, the youngest daughter of Russian immigrants. As an essayist Maas was best known for a detailed, tell-all memoir of her time spent in early Hollywood. She was one of the rare supercentenarians known for reasons other than longevity.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(July 6, 1900 – January 5, 2012) was an American dramatist and playwright, screenwriter, memoirist, and author, the youngest daughter of Russian immigrants. As an essayist Maas was best known for a detailed, tell-all memoir of her time spent in early Hollywood. She was one of the rare supercentenarians known for reasons other than longevity.

Photo of Lakshmi Sahgal

Lakshmi Sahgal

(1914 Oct 24 - 2012 Jul 23) was referred to as Captain Lakshmi. Born in Malabar, she became a gynecologist/obstetrician, officer of the Indian National Army and Minister of Women’s Affairs in the Azad Hind government. During WWII, while a prisoner in Burma, Lakshmi aided the wounded POWs. She joined the communist party, had two daughters, protested the Miss World competition (1996), and saw her patients until 2006.Read More
Website: Revolvy: Lakshmi Sahgal

(1914 Oct 24 – 2012 Jul 23) was referred to as Captain Lakshmi. Born in Malabar, she became a gynecologist/obstetrician, officer of the Indian National Army and Minister of Women’s Affairs in the Azad Hind government. During WWII, while a prisoner in Burma, Lakshmi aided the wounded POWs. She joined the communist party, had two daughters, protested the Miss World competition (1996), and saw her patients until 2006.

Photo of Susanna Madora Salter

Susanna Madora Salter

(1860 Mar 2 - 1761 Mar 17) was the first woman mayor in the US was born. Susanna Madora Salter served as Mayor of Argonia, Kansas for one year. In 1887, Kansas women had gained the right to vote. Enforcement of state prohibition laws was the prime voting issue. Local men disagreed with letting women have any say in political affairs.…Read More
Website: Kansas Historical Society

(1860 Mar 2 – 1761 Mar 17) was the first woman mayor in the US was born. Susanna Madora Salter served as Mayor of Argonia, Kansas for one year. In 1887, Kansas women had gained the right to vote. Enforcement of state prohibition laws was the prime voting issue. Local men disagreed with letting women have any say in political affairs. They decided to nominate Susanna as a joke, but the joke was on them. She won by two-thirds majority and became the first woman Mayor in the United States. She knew more about politics than many of the men. Her husband was Argonia’s first City Clerk, and Susanna had been responsible for writing the city’s ordinances. Her one-year term went by without a hitch and she chose not to run again. After her husband died, in 1916, Susanna moved herself and nine children to Norman, Oklahoma.

Photo of Celia Sanchez

Celia Sanchez

(9 May 1920 – 11 January 1980) was a female leader of the Cuban revolution, the first female to be inducted in the rebel army,  and a close associate of Fidel Castro.Read More
Website: Socialist Action

(9 May 1920 – 11 January 1980) was a female leader of the Cuban revolution, the first female to be inducted in the rebel army,  and a close associate of Fidel Castro.

Photo of Bernice Sandler

Bernice Sandler

Made it possible for Title IX to be signed into law. Title IX prohibited sex discrimination in any federally funded education activity or program. Made it possible for women to gain equality among men in college sports. Early on, she was denied a faculty position because she came on too strong for a woman." "Read More
Website: Website

Made it possible for Title IX to be signed into law. Title IX prohibited sex discrimination in any federally funded education activity or program. Made it possible for women to gain equality among men in college sports. Early on, she was denied a faculty position because she came on too strong for a woman.” “

Photo of Maria Sanford

Maria Sanford

(December 19, 1836 – April 21, 1920) - was the first woman to deliver a commencement speech at a university.  She graduated with honors from Connecticut Normal School, using her dowry funds for tuition. She became principal and superintendent of schools in Chester County, Pennsylvania.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(December 19, 1836 – April 21, 1920) – was the first woman to deliver a commencement speech at a university.  She graduated with honors from Connecticut Normal School, using her dowry funds for tuition. She became principal and superintendent of schools in Chester County, Pennsylvania. She served as professor of history at Swarthmore College from 1871 to 1880. She was one of the first women named to a college    professorship.

Photo of Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi

(Persian: مرجان ساتراپی‎‎) (born 22 November 1969) is an Iranian-born French graphic novelist, cartoonist, illustrator, film director, and children's book author.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(Persian: مرجان ساتراپی‎‎) (born 22 November 1969) is an Iranian-born French graphic novelist, cartoonist, illustrator, film director, and children’s book author.

Photo of Angela Sells

Angela Sells

is a writer who also teaches courses in mythic literature and women’s studies at California's Meridian University, and is co-manager of the Open Book bookstore and co-founder of the Open Book Press. Her book, Sabina Spielrein: The Woman and the Myth (SUNY Press, 2017), explores this key figure in the history of psychoanalytic thought, from a feminist and mytho-poetic perspective.Read More
Website: Ms. Angela Sells, PhD

is a writer who also teaches courses in mythic literature and women’s studies at California’s Meridian University, and is co-manager of the Open Book bookstore and co-founder of the Open Book Press. Her book, Sabina Spielrein: The Woman and the Myth (SUNY Press, 2017), explores this key figure in the history of psychoanalytic thought, from a feminist and mytho-poetic perspective.

Photo of Gitta Sereny

Gitta Sereny

(13 March 1921 – 14 June 2012) was an Austrian-born biographer, historian, and investigative journalist who came to be known for her interviews and profiles of controversial figures, including Mary Bell, who was convicted in 1968 of killing two children when she herself was a child, and Franz Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka extermination camp.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(13 March 1921 – 14 June 2012) was an Austrian-born biographer, historian, and investigative journalist who came to be known for her interviews and profiles of controversial figures, including Mary Bell, who was convicted in 1968 of killing two children when she herself was a child, and Franz Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka extermination camp.

Photo of Mary Ann Shadd Cary

Mary Ann Shadd Cary

(1823 Oct 9 - 1893 Jun 5) was a writer, abolitionist, and the first black newspaperwoman in North America. Mary Ann was one of the most outspoken proponents of abolition of slavery of her day. She and her family moved to Pennsylvania where she went to a Quaker school. Mary taught black children in Delaware, New York and Pennsylvania.…Read More
Website: National Park Service – Cary House

(1823 Oct 9 – 1893 Jun 5) was a writer, abolitionist, and the first black newspaperwoman in North America. Mary Ann was one of the most outspoken proponents of abolition of slavery of her day. She and her family moved to Pennsylvania where she went to a Quaker school. Mary taught black children in Delaware, New York and Pennsylvania. After the Fugitive Slave Law was passed, Mary moved to Canada and founded the first anti-slavery newspaper, the Provincial Freeman. It inspired blacks to emigrate to Canada. She lectured in Canada and the US to increase subscriptions and to solicit aid for runaway slaves. Mary
published Voice from Harper’s Ferry, a tribute to Brown’s raid. She was appointed as a recruiting officer for the Union Army. Mary moved to Washington and studied law at Howard University, and is recognized as one of the first black, female lawyers in America. Mary died in 1893 while still advocating equality for all people.

Photo of Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman

(19 January 1954 - ) is an American photographer and film director, best known for her conceptual portraits. In 1995, she was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.Read More
Website: Cindy Sherman

(19 January 1954 – ) is an American photographer and film director, best known for her conceptual portraits. In 1995, she was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.

Photo of Mary Sherman Morgan

Mary Sherman Morgan

(1921 Nov 4 - 2004 Aug 4) was a rocket fuel scientist who invented Hydyne (liquid rocket fuel), which powered the United States' first satellite, Explorer 1.Read More
Website: Mary Sherman Morgan – Wikipedia

(1921 Nov 4 – 2004 Aug 4) was a rocket fuel scientist who invented Hydyne (liquid rocket fuel), which powered the United States’ first satellite, Explorer 1.

Photo of Ching Shih

Ching Shih

(1775-1844 ) also known as Shi Xainggu, Cheng I Sao, Ching Yih Saou, and Zheng Yi Sao, is today remembered as one of the most successful female pirates in the history of the world. During her active years as a pirate lord in early 19th century, she commanded over the famous Red Flag Fleet that consisted of over 1800 ships and 80 thousand male and female pirates.…Read More

(1775-1844 ) also known as Shi Xainggu, Cheng I Sao, Ching Yih Saou, and Zheng Yi Sao, is today remembered as one of the most successful female pirates in the history of the world. During her active years as a pirate lord in early 19th century, she commanded over the famous Red Flag Fleet that consisted of over 1800 ships and 80 thousand male and female pirates. Under her rule, Chinese pirates became invincible, resisting attacks from every major naval power of her time.

Under her rule Red Flag Fleet flourished. Their incredible strength and power enabled them to pillage and raid every town and ship between Macao to Canton. In addition to controlling the fleet, she also controlled every aspect of the organization’s business. Many stories from that time describe her as ruthless – not only to her victims but even to her crew (executions were not uncommon). Fear that she inflicted to the pirate crew was so big that she had the final word in every raid decision, and all captured wealth were presented to her before dividing it to the surviving pirates.

After several years Chinese government came to the conclusion that their military forces (even with the combined help of England and Portuguese) will never break defenses of Shih’s pirate operation, they finally issued an amnesty for all pirates who were willing to return to the shore as free citizens. She took advantage of this and negotiated pardon for herself and the vast majority of her fleet while retaining all her wealth.

Photo of Murasaki Shikibu

Murasaki Shikibu

(紫 式部?, English: Lady Murasaki; c. 973 or 978 – c. 1014 or 1031) was a Japanese novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at theImperial court during the Heian period. She is best known as the author of The Tale of Genji, written in Japanese between about 1000 and 1012. Murasaki Shikibu is a nickname; her real name is unknown, but she may have been Fujiwara Takako, who was mentioned in a 1007 court diary as an imperial lady-in-waiting.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(紫 式部?, English: Lady Murasaki; c. 973 or 978 – c. 1014 or 1031) was a Japanese novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at theImperial court during the Heian period. She is best known as the author of The Tale of Genji, written in Japanese between about 1000 and 1012. Murasaki Shikibu is a nickname; her real name is unknown, but she may have been Fujiwara Takako, who was mentioned in a 1007 court diary as an imperial lady-in-waiting.