Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Susanna Madora Salter

Susanna Madora Salter

(1860 Mar 2 - 1761 Mar 17) was the first woman mayor in the US was born. Susanna Madora Salter served as Mayor of Argonia, Kansas for one year. In 1887, Kansas women had gained the right to vote. Enforcement of state prohibition laws was the prime voting issue. Local men disagreed with letting women have any say in political affairs.…Read More
Website: Kansas Historical Society

(1860 Mar 2 – 1761 Mar 17) was the first woman mayor in the US was born. Susanna Madora Salter served as Mayor of Argonia, Kansas for one year. In 1887, Kansas women had gained the right to vote. Enforcement of state prohibition laws was the prime voting issue. Local men disagreed with letting women have any say in political affairs. They decided to nominate Susanna as a joke, but the joke was on them. She won by two-thirds majority and became the first woman Mayor in the United States. She knew more about politics than many of the men. Her husband was Argonia’s first City Clerk, and Susanna had been responsible for writing the city’s ordinances. Her one-year term went by without a hitch and she chose not to run again. After her husband died, in 1916, Susanna moved herself and nine children to Norman, Oklahoma.

Photo of Celia Sanchez

Celia Sanchez

(9 May 1920 – 11 January 1980) was a female leader of the Cuban revolution, the first female to be inducted in the rebel army,  and a close associate of Fidel Castro.Read More
Website: Socialist Action

(9 May 1920 – 11 January 1980) was a female leader of the Cuban revolution, the first female to be inducted in the rebel army,  and a close associate of Fidel Castro.

Photo of Bernice Sandler

Bernice Sandler

Made it possible for Title IX to be signed into law. Title IX prohibited sex discrimination in any federally funded education activity or program. Made it possible for women to gain equality among men in college sports. Early on, she was denied a faculty position because she came on too strong for a woman." "Read More
Website: Website

Made it possible for Title IX to be signed into law. Title IX prohibited sex discrimination in any federally funded education activity or program. Made it possible for women to gain equality among men in college sports. Early on, she was denied a faculty position because she came on too strong for a woman.” “

Photo of Maria Sanford

Maria Sanford

(December 19, 1836 – April 21, 1920) - was the first woman to deliver a commencement speech at a university.  She graduated with honors from Connecticut Normal School, using her dowry funds for tuition. She became principal and superintendent of schools in Chester County, Pennsylvania.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(December 19, 1836 – April 21, 1920) – was the first woman to deliver a commencement speech at a university.  She graduated with honors from Connecticut Normal School, using her dowry funds for tuition. She became principal and superintendent of schools in Chester County, Pennsylvania. She served as professor of history at Swarthmore College from 1871 to 1880. She was one of the first women named to a college    professorship.

Photo of Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi

(Persian: مرجان ساتراپی‎‎) (born 22 November 1969) is an Iranian-born French graphic novelist, cartoonist, illustrator, film director, and children's book author.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(Persian: مرجان ساتراپی‎‎) (born 22 November 1969) is an Iranian-born French graphic novelist, cartoonist, illustrator, film director, and children’s book author.

Photo of Angela Sells

Angela Sells

is a writer who also teaches courses in mythic literature and women’s studies at California's Meridian University, and is co-manager of the Open Book bookstore and co-founder of the Open Book Press. Her book, Sabina Spielrein: The Woman and the Myth (SUNY Press, 2017), explores this key figure in the history of psychoanalytic thought, from a feminist and mytho-poetic perspective.Read More
Website: Ms. Angela Sells, PhD

is a writer who also teaches courses in mythic literature and women’s studies at California’s Meridian University, and is co-manager of the Open Book bookstore and co-founder of the Open Book Press. Her book, Sabina Spielrein: The Woman and the Myth (SUNY Press, 2017), explores this key figure in the history of psychoanalytic thought, from a feminist and mytho-poetic perspective.

Photo of Gitta Sereny

Gitta Sereny

(13 March 1921 – 14 June 2012) was an Austrian-born biographer, historian, and investigative journalist who came to be known for her interviews and profiles of controversial figures, including Mary Bell, who was convicted in 1968 of killing two children when she herself was a child, and Franz Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka extermination camp.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(13 March 1921 – 14 June 2012) was an Austrian-born biographer, historian, and investigative journalist who came to be known for her interviews and profiles of controversial figures, including Mary Bell, who was convicted in 1968 of killing two children when she herself was a child, and Franz Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka extermination camp.

Photo of Mary Ann Shadd Cary

Mary Ann Shadd Cary

(1823 Oct 9 - 1893 Jun 5) was a writer, abolitionist, and the first black newspaperwoman in North America. Mary Ann was one of the most outspoken proponents of abolition of slavery of her day. She and her family moved to Pennsylvania where she went to a Quaker school. Mary taught black children in Delaware, New York and Pennsylvania.…Read More
Website: National Park Service – Cary House

(1823 Oct 9 – 1893 Jun 5) was a writer, abolitionist, and the first black newspaperwoman in North America. Mary Ann was one of the most outspoken proponents of abolition of slavery of her day. She and her family moved to Pennsylvania where she went to a Quaker school. Mary taught black children in Delaware, New York and Pennsylvania. After the Fugitive Slave Law was passed, Mary moved to Canada and founded the first anti-slavery newspaper, the Provincial Freeman. It inspired blacks to emigrate to Canada. She lectured in Canada and the US to increase subscriptions and to solicit aid for runaway slaves. Mary
published Voice from Harper’s Ferry, a tribute to Brown’s raid. She was appointed as a recruiting officer for the Union Army. Mary moved to Washington and studied law at Howard University, and is recognized as one of the first black, female lawyers in America. Mary died in 1893 while still advocating equality for all people.

Photo of Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman

(19 January 1954 - ) is an American photographer and film director, best known for her conceptual portraits. In 1995, she was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.Read More
Website: Cindy Sherman

(19 January 1954 – ) is an American photographer and film director, best known for her conceptual portraits. In 1995, she was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.

Photo of Mary Sherman Morgan

Mary Sherman Morgan

(1921 Nov 4 - 2004 Aug 4) was a rocket fuel scientist who invented Hydyne (liquid rocket fuel), which powered the United States' first satellite, Explorer 1.Read More
Website: Mary Sherman Morgan – Wikipedia

(1921 Nov 4 – 2004 Aug 4) was a rocket fuel scientist who invented Hydyne (liquid rocket fuel), which powered the United States’ first satellite, Explorer 1.

Photo of Murasaki Shikibu

Murasaki Shikibu

(紫 式部?, English: Lady Murasaki; c. 973 or 978 – c. 1014 or 1031) was a Japanese novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at theImperial court during the Heian period. She is best known as the author of The Tale of Genji, written in Japanese between about 1000 and 1012. Murasaki Shikibu is a nickname; her real name is unknown, but she may have been Fujiwara Takako, who was mentioned in a 1007 court diary as an imperial lady-in-waiting.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(紫 式部?, English: Lady Murasaki; c. 973 or 978 – c. 1014 or 1031) was a Japanese novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at theImperial court during the Heian period. She is best known as the author of The Tale of Genji, written in Japanese between about 1000 and 1012. Murasaki Shikibu is a nickname; her real name is unknown, but she may have been Fujiwara Takako, who was mentioned in a 1007 court diary as an imperial lady-in-waiting.

Photo of Yoko Shimomura

Yoko Shimomura

(born 1967 Oct 19) graduated from Osaka College of Music. In 1988, she began work in the video game industry and has been there ever since, working on games like "Kingdom Hearts", "Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga", "Legend of Mana" and more. Her inspirations are Beethoven, Chopin and Ravel. Her style has changed dramatically over the years.…Read More
Website: Yoko Shimomura – Wikipedia

(born 1967 Oct 19) graduated from Osaka College of Music. In 1988, she began work in the video game industry and has been there ever since, working on games like “Kingdom Hearts”, “Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga”, “Legend of Mana” and more. Her inspirations are Beethoven, Chopin and Ravel. Her style has changed dramatically over the years. Yoko believes that an important part of the musical process is to “convey a subtle message [that] sticks with the listener without being overly specific about what it means.”

Photo of Army General Sisters

Army General Sisters

Army Maj. Gen. Maria Barrett and her younger sister Brig. Gen. Paula Lodi are believed to be the first sisters to attain general officers' rank. Barrett, 53, and Lodi, 51, are from a family of five children, with a father who was an Italian immigrant and World War II veteran. Their father, Ruston, and mother, Clara, "stressed public service" to their children. …Read More

Army Maj. Gen. Maria Barrett and her younger sister Brig. Gen. Paula Lodi are believed to be the first sisters to attain general officers’ rank. Barrett, 53, and Lodi, 51, are from a family of five children, with a father who was an Italian immigrant and World War II veteran. Their father, Ruston, and mother, Clara, “stressed public service” to their children. 

Maj. Gen. Barrett is the Commanding General of NETCOM. She graduated from Tufts University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in international relations and was commissioned through the Army ROTC program as a Second Lieutenant in 1988.

Brig. Gen. Lodi, is the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations at the Office of the Surgeon General. She is a Distinguished Honor Graduate of the Naval War College and has master’s degrees in public administration, military arts and science, and national security and strategic studies.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville called Barrett and Lodi “exceptional, proven leaders who’ve distinguished themselves over the course of their career at various levels of command during multiple combat tours.”

Photo of Marie Skłodowska Curie

Marie Skłodowska Curie

(November 7, 1867 – July 4, 1934) was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(November 7, 1867 – July 4, 1934) was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.

Photo of Keely Smith

Keely Smith

(1928 Mar 9 - 2017 Dec 16) was an American jazz singer. In May 1959, Keely and her husband, band leader and trumpeter, Louis Prima were awarded the first-ever Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group or Chorus.Read More

(1928 Mar 9 – 2017 Dec 16) was an American jazz singer. In May 1959, Keely and her husband, band leader and trumpeter, Louis Prima were awarded the first-ever Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group or Chorus.

Photo of Annie Smith Peck

Annie Smith Peck

(October 19, 1850 – July 18, 1935) was an American mountaineer. She lectured extensively for many years throughout the United States, and wrote four books encouraging travel and exploration.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 19, 1850 – July 18, 1935) was an American mountaineer. She lectured extensively for many years throughout the United States, and wrote four books encouraging travel and exploration.

Photo of Annie Smith Peck

Annie Smith Peck

(1850 Oct 19 - 1935 Jul 18) was a mountaineer, lecturer, traveler who shocked the world when climbing the Matterhorn - wearing pants. She would say “my home is where my trunk is.”Read More
Website: Annie Smith Peck – Wikipedia

(1850 Oct 19 – 1935 Jul 18) was a mountaineer, lecturer, traveler who shocked the world when climbing the Matterhorn –
wearing pants. She would say “my home is where my trunk is.”

Photo of Mary Somerville

Mary Somerville

(1780 Dec 26 - 1872 Nov 29) was the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society. As a girl, Mary secretly studied math, science, language, and art. She loved the stars and wanted to crack their meaning and mystery. Married twice, she had four children. She was considered the most extraordinary mathematician in Europe. By 1870, she’d been elected to the Royal Astronomical Society, the Societe de Physique, the Royal Irish Academy, the American Geographical Society and the Italian Geographical Society.…Read More
Website: Mary Somerville – Wikipedia

(1780 Dec 26 – 1872 Nov 29) was the first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society. As a girl, Mary secretly studied math, science, language, and art. She loved the stars and wanted to crack their meaning and mystery. Married twice, she had four children. She was considered the most extraordinary mathematician in Europe. By 1870, she’d been elected to the Royal Astronomical Society, the Societe de Physique, the Royal Irish Academy, the American Geographical Society and the Italian Geographical Society. Mary was Ada Lovelace’s tutor. Mary died in 1872. Somerville College, Oxford, Somerville Island, in Barrow Strait, asteroid 5771 Somerville are all named for her. In 2017, Mary’s picture was put on the ten-pound bank note.

Photo of Sabina Spielrein

Sabina Spielrein

(25 October 1885 – 11 August 1942) A Russian physician and one of the first female psychoanalysts. She was a pioneer in the early stages of the birth of psychoanalysis, the first to propose the thesis about instinctual life, which Freud later adapted. Her contributions have been overlooked and, until recently, mostly forgotten.Read More
Website: Commerce Graphics

(25 October 1885 – 11 August 1942) A Russian physician and one of the first female psychoanalysts. She was a pioneer in the early stages of the birth of psychoanalysis, the first to propose the thesis about instinctual life, which Freud later adapted. Her contributions have been overlooked and, until recently, mostly forgotten.

Photo of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge

Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge

(1864 Oct 30 - 1953 Nov 4) was a pianist, patron, philanthropist. Her husband died, then her parents leaving her considerable wealth that she used to promote chamber music. In 1916, Liz established the Berkshire String Quartet, which ultimately became the Berkshire Symphonic Festival at Tanglewood. She encouraged and commissioned all nationalities to write musical compositions.…Read More
Website: Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge – Wikipedia

(1864 Oct 30 – 1953 Nov 4) was a pianist, patron, philanthropist. Her husband died, then her parents leaving her considerable wealth that she used to promote chamber music. In 1916, Liz established the Berkshire String Quartet, which ultimately became the Berkshire Symphonic Festival at Tanglewood. She encouraged and commissioned all nationalities to write musical compositions. Liz performed with world-renowned musicians into her 80s. Her desire to promote “difficult” modern music was explained thus, “…modern music is not that we should like it, nor…that we should…understand it, but that we exhibit it as a significant human document.” Partnering with the Library of Congress, Liz built the Coolidge Auditiorium (1924). Britton, Copeland, Ravel, Prokofiev, Schoenberg and Stravinsky are a few of the composers she commissioned.