Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Patti Paniccia

Patti Paniccia

Patti is a lifetime women's advocate and has worked as an athlete, contest organizer, attorney, and CNN reporter. She was on the very first women’s surfing pro tour (one of only six women). In 1994, she instituted and began teaching Gender and Law classes at Pepperdine School of Law. She is the author of "Work Smarts for Women: The Essential Sex Discrimination Survival Guide."Read More

Patti is a lifetime women’s advocate and has worked as an athlete, contest organizer, attorney, and CNN reporter. She was on the very first women’s surfing pro tour (one of only six women). In 1994, she instituted and began teaching Gender and Law classes at Pepperdine School of Law. She is the author of “Work Smarts for Women: The Essential Sex Discrimination Survival Guide.”

Photo of Alice Parker

Alice Parker

(16 December 1925 - ) is an internationally renowned composer, conductor and teacher, who studied composition and conducting at Smith College and the Juilliard School where she began her long association with Robert Shaw. The many Parker/Shaw settings of American folksongs, hymns and spirituals from that period form an enduring repertoire for choruses all around the world.…Read More
Website: Morning Star Music

(16 December 1925 – ) is an internationally renowned composer, conductor and teacher, who studied composition and conducting at Smith College and the Juilliard School where she began her long association with Robert Shaw. The many Parker/Shaw settings of American folksongs, hymns and spirituals from that period form an enduring repertoire for choruses all around the world. Her list of published compositions has over five hundred titles, ranging from operas through song cycles, cantatas and choral suites to many individual anthems. She has been commissioned by hundreds of community, school and church choruses, and her works appear in the catalogs of a dozen publishing companies.

Photo of Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

(22 August 1893 – 7 June 1967) was a poet, critic, satirist and screenwriter and one of the founding members of the Algonquin Round Table. In 1929, she received the O. Henry Award for her short story "Big Blonde." Her screenwriting received two Academy Award nominations before she was blacklisted by Hollywood for her politics.Read More
Website: Poets.org

(22 August 1893 – 7 June 1967) was a poet, critic, satirist and screenwriter and one of the founding members of the Algonquin Round Table. In 1929, she received the O. Henry Award for her short story “Big Blonde.” Her screenwriting received two Academy Award nominations before she was blacklisted by Hollywood for her politics.

Photo of Lucy Parsons

Lucy Parsons

(1853 – 1942 March 7) was from Texas, of American Indian, Spanish and African American background. An anarchist, revolutionary, socialist, and communist Lucy fought for workers’ rights, women’s rights, and labor unions. She wrote articles for The Socialist, Freedom, and The Liberator. Lucy fought oppression, hunger and unemployment.…Read More
Website: Lucy Parsons

(1853 – 1942 March 7) was from Texas, of American Indian, Spanish and African American background. An anarchist, revolutionary, socialist, and communist Lucy fought for workers’ rights, women’s rights, and labor unions. She wrote articles for The Socialist, Freedom, and The Liberator. Lucy fought oppression, hunger and unemployment. She was married, had 2 kids, her husband was hanged and still she fought until her death from fire in 1942.

Photo of Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

(10 May 1900 -  7 December 1979) was a British-born American astronomer who made pioneering discoveries, including that stars are made mainly of hydrogen and helium, and established that stars could be classified according to their temperatures.  In 1956 she became the first full time female professor at Harvard University.Read More
Website: Brittanica

(10 May 1900 –  7 December 1979) was a British-born American astronomer who made pioneering discoveries, including that stars are made mainly of hydrogen and helium, and established that stars could be classified according to their temperatures.  In 1956 she became the first full time female professor at Harvard University.

Photo of Lt. Heather “Lucky” Penney

Lt. Heather “Lucky” Penney

September 11th pilot. Lt. Heather “Lucky” Penney had her orders on Sept 11th: Bring down United Airlines Flight 93. The day’s fourth hijacked airliner seemed to be hurtling toward Washington. Penney, one of the first two combat pilots in the air that morning, was told to stop it. She didn’t have live ammunition. Or missiles. Or anything at all to throw at a hostile aircraft.…Read More
Website: Article

September 11th pilot. Lt. Heather “Lucky” Penney had her orders on Sept 11th: Bring down United Airlines Flight 93. The day’s fourth hijacked airliner seemed to be hurtling toward Washington. Penney, one of the first two combat pilots in the air that morning, was told to stop it. She didn’t have live ammunition. Or missiles. Or anything at all to throw at a hostile aircraft. Except her own plane. So that was the plan.

Photo of Marguerite Perey

Marguerite Perey

(1909 Oct 19 - 1975 May 13) was a French physicist who discovered the last naturally produced element, Francium. She studied under Marie Curie.Read More
Website: FamousScientists.com

(1909 Oct 19 – 1975 May 13) was a French physicist who discovered the last naturally produced element, Francium. She studied under Marie Curie.

Photo of Frances Perkins Wilson

Frances Perkins Wilson

(born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. As a loyal supporter of her friend, Franklin D. Roosevelt, she helped pull the labor movement into the New Deal coalition.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born Fannie Coralie Perkins; April 10, 1880 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, the longest serving in that position, and the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. As a loyal supporter of her friend, Franklin D. Roosevelt, she helped pull the labor movement into the New Deal coalition. She and Interior Secretary Harold L. Ickes were the only original members of the Roosevelt cabinet to remain in office for his entire presidency.

Photo of Ann Petry

Ann Petry

(1908 Oct 12 - 1997 Apr 28) was the first black woman writer with book sales of over a million copies. Raised in modest privilege in Connecticut. She suffered a few racist incidences, but lived a rather sheltered life. Ann got a Ph.G degree in pharmacy to follow in the family business. She also wrote short stories.…Read More
Website: Ann Petry – Wikipedia

(1908 Oct 12 – 1997 Apr 28) was the first black woman writer with book sales of over a million copies. Raised in modest privilege in Connecticut. She suffered a few racist incidences, but lived a rather sheltered life. Ann got a Ph.G degree in pharmacy to follow in the family business. She also wrote short stories. Ann married in 1938, moved to Harlem and had her eyes opened to what it meant to live among a large population of poor black people. Her daughter Liz said, “her way of dealing…was to write this book which maybe was something that people who had grown up in Harlem couldn’t do.” The Street, published in 1946, sold over one million copies. Ann and her family moved back to Connecticut in 1947 where she wrote several more books, more short stories and children’s books.

Photo of Jeannette Piccard

Jeannette Piccard

(1895 Jan 5 - 1981 May 17) was a balloonist, Episcopalian priest and considered by some, the first woman in space. Jeannette was the first licensed female balloon pilot, and the first woman to fly to the stratosphere…in 1934! With her husband, she controlled the balloon to 10.9 miles, over 57,000 feet. She got a degree in organic chemistry from U of Minn.…Read More
Website: Jeannette Piccard – Wikipedia

(1895 Jan 5 – 1981 May 17) was a balloonist, Episcopalian priest and considered by some, the first woman in space. Jeannette was the first licensed female balloon pilot, and the first woman to fly to the stratosphere…in 1934! With her husband, she controlled the balloon to 10.9 miles, over 57,000 feet. She got a degree in organic chemistry from U of Minn. From ’64 to ’70, Jeannette consulted with NASA about the space program. In ’71, Jeannette was ordained a deacon, then in ’79, Jeannette became an ordained priest.

Photo of Marge Piercy

Marge Piercy

(born 1936 March 31), is an activist, novelist and poet, Marge is one of the multidimensional writers of the feminist voice…science fiction (Hem She, and It) or sweeping historical novels (Gone to Soldiers). Marge is an associate of the Women’s Institute for Freedom of the Press (WIFP). A few pieces can be found in the quintessential 70s anthology, Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women’s Liberation Movement.Read More
Website: About Marge Piercy

(born 1936 March 31), is an activist, novelist and poet, Marge is one of the multidimensional writers of the feminist voice…science fiction (Hem She, and It) or sweeping historical novels (Gone to Soldiers). Marge is an associate of the Women’s Institute for Freedom of the Press (WIFP). A few pieces can be found in the quintessential 70s anthology, Sisterhood is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women’s Liberation Movement.

Photo of Nadezhda Popova

Nadezhda Popova

(7 December 1921 – 8 July 2013) - One of the first military female pilots in the Soviet Union. Was highly decorated with awards including the title "Hero of the Soviet Union", the Gold Star Medal, the Order of Lenin, and three Orders of the Red Star during the WWII. Part of the Night’s Witches.Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(7 December 1921 – 8 July 2013) – One of the first military female pilots in the Soviet Union. Was highly decorated with awards including the title “Hero of the Soviet Union”, the Gold Star Medal, the Order of Lenin, and three Orders of the Red Star during the WWII. Part of the Night’s Witches.

Photo of Harriet Powers

Harriet Powers

(October 29, 1837 – January 1, 1910) was an African-American slave, folk artist, and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Only two of her quilts are known to have survived: Bible Quilt 1886 and Pictorial Quilt 1898. Her quilts are considered among the finest examples of nineteenth-century Southern quilting.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 29, 1837 – January 1, 1910) was an African-American slave, folk artist, and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Only two of her quilts are known to have survived: Bible Quilt 1886 and Pictorial Quilt 1898. Her quilts are considered among the finest examples of nineteenth-century Southern quilting. Her work is on display at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts.

Photo of Michele Pred

Michele Pred

Michele Pred is a Swedish-American conceptual artist. She works with found and confiscated objects and technology imbued with cultural and political meaning. Her artwork has been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums in London, Stockholm, Sydney, New York, Bologna, Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. Her work is part of the permanent collection at the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, the 21st Century Museum,Read More
Website: Website

Michele Pred is a Swedish-American conceptual artist. She works with found and confiscated objects and technology imbued with cultural and political meaning. Her artwork has been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums in London, Stockholm, Sydney, New York, Bologna, Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. Her work is part of the permanent collection at the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York, the 21st Century Museum,

Photo of Francis Preston

Francis Preston

(1986 until 2004) Preston served as President and CEO of BMI from 1986 until 2004. Divorced secretary who turned bmi into a multi-million dollar organization. Helped pave the way for royalty rights in the music industry. The Nashville native nurtured the careers of thousands of songwriters, performers and publishers in all musical genres during her career at BMI, which spanned six decades.Read More
Website: Memorial

(1986 until 2004) Preston served as President and CEO of BMI from 1986 until 2004. Divorced secretary who turned bmi into a multi-million dollar organization. Helped pave the way for royalty rights in the music industry. The Nashville native nurtured the careers of thousands of songwriters, performers and publishers in all musical genres during her career at BMI, which spanned six decades.

Photo of Anna Eleanor Roosevelt

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt

(/ˈɛlᵻnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.President Harry S.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(/ˈɛlᵻnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat, and activist. She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.President Harry S. Truman later called her the First Lady of the World” in tribute to her human rights achievements. “

Photo of Martha Roundtree

Martha Roundtree

(October 23, 1911 – August 23, 1999) was an American pioneering broadcast journalist and entrepreneur. She was the creator and first moderator of a public-affairs program, first on radio as The American Mercury from June 24, 1945, and as Meet the Press on the NBC television network from November 6, 1947. She remains the only female moderator in the over-six-decade history of the show.Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(October 23, 1911 – August 23, 1999) was an American pioneering broadcast journalist and entrepreneur. She was the creator and first moderator of a public-affairs program, first on radio as The American Mercury from June 24, 1945, and as Meet the Press on the NBC television network from November 6, 1947. She remains the only female moderator in the over-six-decade history of the show.

Photo of Diana E.H. Russell

Diana E.H. Russell

(born 1938 Nov 6) is a teacher, feminist, writer, and outspoken speaker on sexual violence against women and girls. Raised in Cape Town, South Africa, her earliest involvement with anti-apartheid and humane causes has never left her. She was in a peaceful protest, and arrested. The brutal and uber-violence of the white Afrikaner police state could not by stopped by peaceful methods.…Read More
Website: Diana E.H. Russell – Wikipedia

(born 1938 Nov 6) is a teacher, feminist, writer, and outspoken speaker on sexual violence against women and girls. Raised in Cape Town, South Africa, her earliest involvement with anti-apartheid and humane causes has never left her. She was in a peaceful protest, and arrested. The brutal and uber-violence of the white Afrikaner police state could not by stopped by peaceful methods. To this day, she still risks jail if she returns to Cape Town. In 1969, moving to the US, Diana taught Sociology at UC San Francisco, and Mills College, introducing one of the first women’s studies courses in the US. In 1976, Diana redefined femicide as “the killing of females by males, because they are female.” Diana speaks and writes still and has been the recipient of many awards and honorariums.

Photo of Frederica Sagor Maas

Frederica Sagor Maas

(July 6, 1900 – January 5, 2012) was an American dramatist and playwright, screenwriter, memoirist, and author, the youngest daughter of Russian immigrants. As an essayist Maas was best known for a detailed, tell-all memoir of her time spent in early Hollywood. She was one of the rare supercentenarians known for reasons other than longevity.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(July 6, 1900 – January 5, 2012) was an American dramatist and playwright, screenwriter, memoirist, and author, the youngest daughter of Russian immigrants. As an essayist Maas was best known for a detailed, tell-all memoir of her time spent in early Hollywood. She was one of the rare supercentenarians known for reasons other than longevity.

Photo of Lakshmi Sahgal

Lakshmi Sahgal

(1914 Oct 24 - 2012 Jul 23) was referred to as Captain Lakshmi. Born in Malabar, she became a gynecologist/obstetrician, officer of the Indian National Army and Minister of Women’s Affairs in the Azad Hind government. During WWII, while a prisoner in Burma, Lakshmi aided the wounded POWs. She joined the communist party, had two daughters, protested the Miss World competition (1996), and saw her patients until 2006.Read More
Website: Revolvy: Lakshmi Sahgal

(1914 Oct 24 – 2012 Jul 23) was referred to as Captain Lakshmi. Born in Malabar, she became a gynecologist/obstetrician, officer of the Indian National Army and Minister of Women’s Affairs in the Azad Hind government. During WWII, while a prisoner in Burma, Lakshmi aided the wounded POWs. She joined the communist party, had two daughters, protested the Miss World competition (1996), and saw her patients until 2006.