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Directory 2017-12-04T18:01:55+00:00

Even More Astonishing Women

Photo of Berenice Abbott

Berenice Abbott

(17 July 1898 - 9 December 1991) was a pioneer of modern American photography. She is best known for her powerful black and white photos of New York City in the 1930s. She also is known as being responsible for the present day fame of the French photographer Eugene Atget, whose work she brought to America, after her formative years of working in Paris as an assistant to Man Ray, and subsequently establishing her successful portrait business there.Read More
Website: Commerce Graphics

(17 July 1898 – 9 December 1991) was a pioneer of modern American photography. She is best known for her powerful black and white photos of New York City in the 1930s. She also is known as being responsible for the present day fame of the French photographer Eugene Atget, whose work she brought to America, after her formative years of working in Paris as an assistant to Man Ray, and subsequently establishing her successful portrait business there.

Photo of Augusta Ada King (Ada Lovelace)

Augusta Ada King (Ada Lovelace)

(10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognized as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, she is often regarded as the first computer programmer.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognized as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, she is often regarded as the first computer programmer.

Photo of Clover Adams

Clover Adams

(13 September 1843 – 6 December 1885) was an American socialite, active society hostess and an accomplished photographer. She has been cited as the inspiration for writer Henry James's "Daisy Miller" and "The Portrait of a Lady."  Her work was widely admired, although her husband apparently would not allow her to become professional and discouraged any publication of her photographs.Read More
Website: Atlas Obscura

(13 September 1843 – 6 December 1885) was an American socialite, active society hostess and an accomplished photographer. She has been cited as the inspiration for writer Henry James’s “Daisy Miller” and “The Portrait of a Lady.”  Her work was widely admired, although her husband apparently would not allow her to become professional and discouraged any publication of her photographs.

Photo of Maria Gaetana Agnesi

Maria Gaetana Agnesi

(16 May 1718 – 9 January 1799) was an Italian mathematician and philosopher. She was the first woman to write a mathematics handbook and the first woman appointed as a Mathematics Professor at a University. Mathematician who figured out the formula for the bell shaped curve still used today.Read More

(16 May 1718 – 9 January 1799) was an Italian mathematician and philosopher. She was the first woman to write a mathematics handbook and the first woman appointed as a Mathematics Professor at a University. Mathematician who figured out the formula for the bell shaped curve still used today.

Photo of Anna Akhmatova

Anna Akhmatova

(23 June 1889 - 5 March 1966) Anna Akhmatova is regarded as one of the greatest Russian poets. Besides poetry, which constitutes the lion’s share of her literary legacy, she wrote prose—primarily memoirs, autobiographical pieces, and literary scholarship, including her outstanding essays on Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin. She also produced many first-rate translations of Italian, French, Armenian, and Korean poetry.Read More
Website: Poetry Foundation

(23 June 1889 – 5 March 1966) Anna Akhmatova is regarded as one of the greatest Russian poets. Besides poetry, which constitutes the lion’s share of her literary legacy, she wrote prose—primarily memoirs, autobiographical pieces, and literary scholarship, including her outstanding essays on Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin. She also produced many first-rate translations of Italian, French, Armenian, and Korean poetry.

Photo of Fatima al-Fihri

Fatima al-Fihri

(born 800- died 880) was an Arab Muslim woman who is credited for founding The University of Al Quaraouiyine in Fes, Morocco in 859 CE. The madrasa (a college for Islamic instruction) she founded is still in operation today. It is the oldest continually operating educational institution in the world and is sometimes referred to as the world's oldest university, though it did not officially become a university until the 1950s.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(born 800- died 880) was an Arab Muslim woman who is credited for founding The University of Al Quaraouiyine in Fes, Morocco in 859 CE. The madrasa (a college for Islamic instruction) she founded is still in operation today. It is the oldest continually operating educational institution in the world and is sometimes referred to as the world’s oldest university, though it did not officially become a university until the 1950s. The mosque is also still in operation, and is one of the largest in North Africa.

Photo of Margaret Anderson

Margaret Anderson

(November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973) was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. The periodical is most noted for introducing many prominent American and British writers of the 20th century, such as Ezra Pound and T.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973) was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929. The periodical is most noted for introducing many prominent American and British writers of the 20th century, such as Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot in the United States, and publishing the first thirteen chapters of James Joyce’s then-unpublished novel, Ulysses.

Photo of Anna Atkins

Anna Atkins

(16 March 1799 – 9 June 1871) was an English botanist and, some argue, the very first female photographer, most noted for using photography in her books on various plants. She is known for her work with cyanotypes and became a member of the Botanical Society in London in 1839, one of the few scientific societies which was open to women.Read More
Website: Public Domain Review

(16 March 1799 – 9 June 1871) was an English botanist and, some argue, the very first female photographer, most noted for using photography in her books on various plants. She is known for her work with cyanotypes and became a member of the Botanical Society in London in 1839, one of the few scientific societies which was open to women.

Photo of Alice Austen

Alice Austen

(March 17, 1866 - June 9, 1952) was one of America's earliest and most prolific female photographers.  Though best known for her documentary work, Austen was an artist with a strong aesthetic sensibility.  Furthermore, she was a landscape designer, a master tennis player, and the first woman on Staten Island to own a car.  A rebel who broke away from the ties of her Victorian environment, Alice Austen created her own independent life.Read More
Website: Alice Austen House

(March 17, 1866 – June 9, 1952) was one of America’s earliest and most prolific female photographers.  Though best known for her documentary work, Austen was an artist with a strong aesthetic sensibility.  Furthermore, she was a landscape designer, a master tennis player, and the first woman on Staten Island to own a car.  A rebel who broke away from the ties of her Victorian environment, Alice Austen created her own independent life.

Photo of Mavis Batey

Mavis Batey

(5 May 1921 – 12 November 2013), was an English code-breaker at Bletchley Park during World War II. Her work was one of the keys to the success of D-Day. In December 1941 she broke a message between Belgrade and Berlin that enabled Dilly Knox's team to work out the wiring of the Abwehr Enigma, an Enigma machine previously thought to be unbreakable.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(5 May 1921 – 12 November 2013), was an English code-breaker at Bletchley Park during World War II. Her work was one of the keys to the success of D-Day. In December 1941 she broke a message between Belgrade and Berlin that enabled Dilly Knox’s team to work out the wiring of the Abwehr Enigma, an Enigma machine previously thought to be unbreakable. While at Bletchley Park she met Keith Batey, a mathematician and fellow codebreaker whom she married in 1942.

Photo of Mary Beale

Mary Beale

(nee Craddock) - (26 March 1633 – 1699) was an English portrait painter. She became one of the most important portrait painters of 17th-century England, and is described as the first professional female English painter.  Her portrait of Rachel Carew smiling so impressed Daphne du Maurier whilst at Antony House Plymouth that it formed an inspiration for her novel My Cousin Rachel.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(nee Craddock) – (26 March 1633 – 1699) was an English portrait painter. She became one of the most important portrait painters of 17th-century England, and is described as the first professional female English painter.  Her portrait of Rachel Carew smiling so impressed Daphne du Maurier whilst at Antony House Plymouth that it formed an inspiration for her novel My Cousin Rachel.

Photo of Aphra Behn (nee Johnson)

Aphra Behn (nee Johnson)

(14 December 1640– 16 April 1689). A British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. As one of the first English women to earn her living by her writing, she broke cultural barriers and served as a literary role model for later generations of women authors.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(14 December 1640– 16 April 1689). A British playwright, poet, translator and fiction writer from the Restoration era. As one of the first English women to earn her living by her writing, she broke cultural barriers and served as a literary role model for later generations of women authors.

Photo of Elizabeth Blackwell

Elizabeth Blackwell

(3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910) - A British-born medical practitioner and the first woman to graduate medical school. She opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children after much objection. A pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in the United Kingdom.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(3 February 1821 – 31 May 1910) – A British-born medical practitioner and the first woman to graduate medical school. She opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children after much objection. A pioneer in promoting the education of women in medicine in the United States, and a social and moral reformer in both the United States and in the United Kingdom.

Photo of Lilian Bland

Lilian Bland

(22 September 1878 – 11 May 1971) was an Anglo-Irish journalist and aviator who, in 1910–11, became one of the first women in the world to design, build, and fly an aircraft.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(22 September 1878 – 11 May 1971) was an Anglo-Irish journalist and aviator who, in 1910–11, became one of the first women in the world to design, build, and fly an aircraft.

Photo of Carol Bly

Carol Bly

(16 April 1930 - 21 December 2007) was a teacher and an award-winning American author of short stories, essays,  and nonfiction works on writing. Her work often featured Minnesota women who must identify the moral crisis that is facing their community or themselves and enact change through empathy, or opening one's eyes to the realities of the situation.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(16 April 1930 – 21 December 2007) was a teacher and an award-winning American author of short stories, essays,  and nonfiction works on writing. Her work often featured Minnesota women who must identify the moral crisis that is facing their community or themselves and enact change through empathy, or opening one’s eyes to the realities of the situation.

Photo of Hedda Bolgar

Hedda Bolgar

(August 19, 1909 – May 13, 2013) was a psychoanalyst in Los Angeles, California, who maintained an active practice when she was over 100 years old. She saw patients four days a week at age 102. She studied at the University of Vienna. Bolgar was one of the last living psychologists to have attended Freud's lectures in Vienna.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 19, 1909 – May 13, 2013) was a psychoanalyst in Los Angeles, California, who maintained an active practice when she was over 100 years old. She saw patients four days a week at age 102.
She studied at the University of Vienna. Bolgar was one of the last living psychologists to have attended Freud’s lectures in Vienna. She received an Outstanding Oldest Worker Award in 2011 in Washington D.C. at age 102.

Photo of Harriet Boyd (Hawes)

Harriet Boyd (Hawes)

(October 11, 1871 – March 31, 1945) was a pioneering American archaeologist, nurse and relief worker. She is best known as the first director of an archaeological excavation to discover and excavate a Minoan settlement and palace site on the Aegean island of Crete. In 1920, the Hawes' moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts and Harriet joined the faculty at Wellesley College lecturing on Ancient Art.Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(October 11, 1871 – March 31, 1945) was a pioneering American archaeologist, nurse and relief worker. She is best known as the first director of an archaeological excavation to discover and excavate a Minoan settlement and palace site on the Aegean island of Crete. In 1920, the Hawes’ moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts and Harriet joined the faculty at Wellesley College lecturing on Ancient Art.

Photo of Alice Bradley Sheldon

Alice Bradley Sheldon

(August 24, 1915 – May 19, 1987) was an American science fiction author better known as James Tiptree Jr., a pen name she used from 1967 to her death. She was most notable for breaking down the barriers between writing perceived as inherently male" or "female"—it was not publicly known until 1977 that James Tiptree Jr.…Read More
Website: Wikipedia

(August 24, 1915 – May 19, 1987) was an American science fiction author better known as James Tiptree Jr., a pen name she used from 1967 to her death. She was most notable for breaking down the barriers between writing perceived as inherently male” or “female”—it was not publicly known until 1977 that James Tiptree Jr. was a woman. From 1974 to 1977 she also used the pen name Raccoona Sheldon. “

Photo of Pearl Buck

Pearl Buck

(June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973) - She was an American writer and novelist. As the daughter of missionaries, Buck spent most of her life before 1934 in China.The first writer to portray the ordinary lives of Chinese people for a Western audience. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the United States in 1931 and 1932 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932.…Read More
Website: Biography Website: Wikipedia

(June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973) – She was an American writer and novelist. As the daughter of missionaries, Buck spent most of her life before 1934 in China.The first writer to portray the ordinary lives of Chinese people for a Western audience. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the United States in 1931 and 1932 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. In 1938, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Photo of Hortense Calisher

Hortense Calisher

(December 20, 1911 – January 13, 2009) was an American writer of fiction. Grew up during the depression. After she turned 50 she wrote 23 books and some short stories. A past president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and of PEN, the worldwide association of writers, she was a National Book Award finalist three times, won an O.…Read More
Website: Article Website: Wikipedia

(December 20, 1911 – January 13, 2009) was an American writer of fiction. Grew up during the depression. After she turned 50 she wrote 23 books and some short stories. A past president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and of PEN, the worldwide association of writers, she was a National Book Award finalist three times, won an O. Henry Award.

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