LUCIA JACOBS ON SARAH BLAFFER HRDY

We’ve heard of Darwin and Alexander Fleming. But have you heard of Sarah Blaffer Hrdy? Blaffer Hrdy is an anthropologist – who among other things ­– proved that like men, females are competitive, independent, and sexually assertive beings. *Gasp*

Oh yeah, and they don’t just mate to reproduce – they can actually enjoy sex.

Blaffer Hrdy’s work was pretty outrageous for the time, and made her work not just groundbreaking for sociobiologists, but for feminists too.

In this video, Lucia Jacobs (Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Berkeley) recounts the incredible untold story of Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, the biologist our textbooks should have included.

LUCIA JACOBS ON SARAH BLAFFER HRDY:
We’ve heard of Darwin and Stephen Jay Gould, but have you heard of Sarah Blaffer Hrdy? Hrdy is an anthropologist who— among other things— proved that like males, females are competitive, independent, and sexually assertive beings. (Shocking!) Oh yeah, and they don’t just mate to reproduce— they can actually enjoy sex.

Hrdy’s findings were groundbreaking not just for scientists, but for feminists too. In this video, Lucia recounts the incredible untold story of disrupter Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, the biologist our textbooks should have included.

More About…

Lucia Jacobs

PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AND NEUROSCIENCE

Lucia Jacobs is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Berkeley. Trained in biology (1986 Ph.D., Princeton), she studies how an individual’s cognition and brain are adapted to its environment.

Sarah Blaffer Hrdy

PROFESSOR OR ANTHROPOLOGY AND PRIMATOLOGY

Sarah Hrdy is professor emerita at the University of California-Davis and Associate in the Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology at Harvard. A former Guggenheim fellow, she has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the California Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. Her books include The Langurs of Abu: Female and Male Strategies of Reproduction; The Woman that Never Evolved; Mother Nature: A History of Mothers, Infants and Natural Selection; and Mothers and Others: The Evolutionary Origins of Mutual Understanding, an exploration of psychological implications of humankind’s long legacy of shared child-rearing which has been awarded both the 2012 J.I. Staley Prize from the School of Advanced Research and a second Howells Prize.